megaton

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Related to megatonnes: gigaton, metric ton, Kilotonne, Metric tonnes

meg·a·ton

 (mĕg′ə-tŭn′)
n.
A unit of explosive energy equal to that of one million metric tons of TNT.

meg′a·ton′nage (-tŭn′ĭj) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

megaton

(ˈmɛɡəˌtʌn)
n
1. (Units) one million tons
2. (Units) an explosive power, esp of a nuclear weapon, equal to the power of one million tons of TNT. Abbreviation: mt
megatonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

meg•a•ton

(ˈmɛg əˌtʌn)

n.
1. one million tons.
2. an explosive force equal to that of one million tons of TNT. Abbr.: MT
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.megaton - a measure of explosive power (of an atomic weapon) equal to that of one million tons of TNTmegaton - a measure of explosive power (of an atomic weapon) equal to that of one million tons of TNT
explosive unit - any unit for measuring the force of explosions
2.megaton - one million tons
avoirdupois unit - any of the units of the avoirdupois system of weights
kiloton - one thousand tons
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مِلْيون طُن
megatunový
megaton
megatonni
megatonna
megatonn
megatonmegatone
megatoninismegatonų
megatonnas-, megatonnu-
megatonový
bir milyon tonmegaton

megaton

[ˈmegətʌn] Nmegatón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

megaton

[ˈmɛgətʌn] nmégatonne f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

megaton

[ˈmɛgəˌtʌn] nmegaton m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

megaton

(ˈmegətan) adjective
(usually with a number) (of a bomb) giving an explosion as great as that of a million tons of TNT. a five-megaton bomb.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
They feature a target of a 36 per cent decrease in emissions by as early as 2022, while the report also states that the net amount the region should be looking to emit up to 2100 is 126 megatonnes of CO2.
The agency's decision means Vale will be able to partially resume dry procession operations within 24 hours, totalling around 5 megatonnes of additional production in 2019.
IRENA analysis suggests a transformation of Africa's energy sector with renewables by 2030, would result in carbon-dioxide emission reductions of up to 310 megatonnes per annum and create millions of jobs across the continent.
If that could be achieved, not only would electricity access be improved, but it would also lead to carbon-dioxide emissions reductions of up to 310 megatonnes a year.
But smaller asteroids can unleash megatonnes of energy too.
In spite of that, 10 megatonnes of food go to waste in the UK every year, says Brewer.
A source in the defense industry earlier told TASS that the Poseidon drone being developed in Russia would be capable of carrying a nuclear warhead with a yield of up to 2 megatonnes to destroy enemy naval bases.
Canada's energy sector, comprising stationary combustion, transport and fugitive emission sources, produced the majority of Canada's total GHG emissions in 2013, at 81% or 588 megatonnes. The remaining emissions were largely generated by sources within the agriculture sector (8% of total emissions), industrial processes and product use sector (7%), and the waste sector (3%), See Environment and Climate Change Canada, "Canada's Second Biennial Report on Climate Change", (Ottawa: ECCC, 2016) at 4, online: <canada.ca/content/dam/eccc/migration/main/ges-ghg/02d095cb-bab0-40d6-b7f0)-828145249af5/3001-20unfccc-202nd-20biennial-20report_e_v7_lowres.pdf >.
The setting for this debate is the Paris Climate Accord under which, shortly after they won the 2015 general election, the Liberals committed Canada to reduce annual GHG emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030 (from 740 to 520 megatonnes of C[O.sub.2] equivalent.) The first of the three position papers is by Andrew Leach, who has been central in defining Alberta's strategy in the federal-provincial negotiations following Canada's commitment under the Accord.
The proposed 1,050MW plant will emit as much as 8.8 megatonnes of carbondioxide per year, they noted.