meitnerium


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Related to meitnerium: Roentgenium, darmstadtium

meit·ner·i·um

 (mīt-nûr′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Mt
An artificially produced radioactive element with atomic number 109 that has known isotopes with mass numbers ranging from 265 to 279. The isotope with the longest confirmed half-life (0.7 seconds) is Mt-268. See Periodic Table.

[After Lise Meitner.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

meitnerium

(ˈmaɪtnɪərɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a synthetic element produced in small quantities by high-energy ion bombardment. Symbol: Mt; atomic no: 109
[C20: named after Lise Meitner]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

meit·ner·i·um

(mīt-nûr′ē-əm)
Symbol Mt A synthetic, radioactive element that is produced by bombarding bismuth with iron ions. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of 70 milliseconds. Atomic number 109. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meitnerium - a radioactive transuranic element
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
мейтнерий
meitnerium
meitneerium
meitnerium
meitnérium
meitnerij
meitnerio
マイトネリウム
meitnerium
meitnerium
meitner
meitneriu
meitnerium
meitnerium
References in periodicals archive ?
Linked with Moscovium - (Discovered in a laboratory in Moscow); Copernicium - (Nicolaus Copernicus, Scientist); Roentgenium - (Wilhelm Rontgen); Meitnerium -(Lise Meitner); Lawrencium - (Ernest Lawrence); Nobelium - (Alfred Nobel), and Rutherfordium - Ernest Rutherford, New Zealand).
A new element, Meitnerium, is named in her honor--60 years later.
While a few of these scientists later claimed Nobel prizes or appeared on postage stamps, one gained what may be the ultimate chemical accolade: Austrian physicist Lise Meitner had element 109, meitnerium, named in her honor.