melamine


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mel·a·mine

 (mĕl′ə-mēn′)
n.
1. A white crystalline compound, C3H6N6, used in making melamine resins and waterproof coatings, for tanning leather, and as an additive to fertilizer to regulate the rate of nitrogen release. Melamine has also been used as an illicit and harmful additive to foodstuffs to increase the apparent amount of protein present based upon assays for nitrogen.
2. A plastic made from melamine resin.

[German Melamin : blend of Melam, distillate of ammonium thiocyanate (mel-, arbitrary pref. + Am(monium), ammonium) and Amin, amine.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melamine

(ˈmɛləˌmiːn)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a colourless crystalline compound used in making synthetic resins; 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine. Formula: C3H6N6
2. (Elements & Compounds) melamine resin or a material made from this resin
[C19: from German Melamin, from Melam distillate of ammonium thiocyanate, with -am representing ammonia]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mel•a•mine

(ˈmɛl əˌmin)

n.
1. a crystalline solid, C3H6N6, used in organic synthesis and in manufacturing resins.
2. any of the melamine resins.
[< German Melamin (1834)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melamine - a white crystalline organic basemelamine - a white crystalline organic base; used mainly in making melamine resins
alkali, base - any of various water-soluble compounds capable of turning litmus blue and reacting with an acid to form a salt and water; "bases include oxides and hydroxides of metals and ammonia"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
melamina

melamine

[ˈmeləmiːn] Nmelamina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

melamine

nMelamin nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

melamine

[ˈmɛləˌmiːn] nmelammina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In a longer development process, it was possible for the first time to make the raw material melamine resin available for a thermoplastic processing process and to produce a duromeric end product - smartMelamine.
A contract worth 280 million euros has been signed with Iran's private sector for the construction of the country's first Crystal Melamine Petrochemical Park in the city of Dehdasht in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad Province, Rasool Ashrafzdeh told ILNA on September 6.
Melamine is a white, crystalline chemical that was developed in the 1830s.
The problems related to melamine and cyanuric acid contamination have pointed out the need for rapid and reliable techniques capable of detecting these analytes.
Keywords: Arylmethylenemalonitriles, Melamine, Ultrasound, Catalysis
As the weather warms up, retailers are positioning melamine dinnerware front and center in their stores, catalogs and online.
Melamine products are an attractive and inexpensive alternative to wood or plywood.
The report covers the melamine formaldehyde market in North America and further segments the market on the basis of application and country.
urea, cyanuric acid, ammelide, ammeline and melamine and its analogues (Ingelfinge,2008;Lakhshmi, 2012).
Melamine formaldehyde resins were discovered in Germany in the early thirties but there was no commercial development in this century.
The dairy industry implemented low melamine limits and instigated testing at various stages in the food chain.
Melamine is commonly used as an ingredient in certain laminates, coatings, plastics, resins, adhesives, dishware, kitchenware, and rubber and paper products.