melancholious

Related to melancholious: melancholy, melancholia, melancholic

melancholious

(ˌmɛlənˈkəʊlɪəs)
adj
suffering from, or inclined to, melancholy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Waxy says she has him"--here the Rector shook his fist at the moon, with something very like an oath, and added, in a melancholious tone, "--down in her will for fifty thousand; and there won't be above thirty to divide."
Therefore their complexion is passing melancholious, their colour swart, and their diseases very perilous." (61) The medieval association with Jewish melancholy and bleeding has dropped away, as has the notion of Jewish pallor.
He himself had despaired at the evanescence of penitential comfort: a "godly" but "melancholious" man, Crisp, according to the presbyterian Samuel Rutherford, had "builded much on qualifications and signes" before falling "to the other extremity of no signes of sanctification at all." (29)