melanoma

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Related to melanomas: malignant melanoma, skin cancer

mel·a·no·ma

 (mĕl′ə-nō′mə)
n. pl. mel·a·no·mas or mel·a·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A dark-pigmented, usually malignant tumor arising from a melanocyte and occurring most commonly in the skin.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melanoma

(ˌmɛləˈnəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a malignant tumour composed of melanocytes, occurring esp in the skin, often as a result of excessive exposure to sunlight
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mel•a•no•ma

(ˌmɛl əˈnoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
any of several types of skin tumors characterized by the malignant growth of melanocytes.
[1825–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mel·a·no·ma

(mĕl′ə-nō′mə)
A type of skin cancer that arises from the cells that produce melanin, usually appearing as a dark-colored spot or mole.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melanoma

any malignant growth, especially in the skin, that is composed of melanin-producing cells.
See also: Cancer
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melanoma - any of several malignant neoplasms (usually of the skin) consisting of melanocytesmelanoma - any of several malignant neoplasms (usually of the skin) consisting of melanocytes
skin cancer - a malignant neoplasm of the skin
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
melanom
melanoom
melanooma
melanome
melanoma
メラノーマ
melanoma
melanoom
melanom

melanoma

[ˌmeləˈnəʊmə] N (melanomas or melanomata (pl)) [ˌmeləˈnəʊmətə]melanoma m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

melanoma

[ˌmɛləˈnəʊmə] nmélanome m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

melanoma

n (Med) → Melanom nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mel·a·no·ma

n. melanoma, tumor maligno compuesto de melanocitos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

melanoma

n melanoma m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mucosal melanomas of the head and neck: the princess margaret hospital experience.
FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple primary melanomas have worse overall survival than those with a single primary melanoma, according to a study published online June 26 in JAMA Dermatology.
Forty-four % of melanomas were American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage I, 24% were Stage II and 32% were Stage III.
Nodular melanomas are classically defined as melanomas that have an invasive component with a junctional component that does not extend more than 3 rete ridges beyond the invasive component.1,2 Clinically, they present as papules or nodules that grow rapidly and may progress to ulcerate and/or bleed.
1 unifying factor in childhood melanomas. Other key clues include raised lesions with uniform color or no pigmentation at all.
The risk of recurrence and higher risk of additional new melanomas after diagnosis warrants long-term skin checks by a dermatologist and self-exams by the patient.
We can appreciate from this case that melanomas on the foot can initially resemble a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU).
Melanomas may arise from the skin or mucosal covering of the respiratory, alimentary, and genitourinary tracts.
Cutaneous melanomas account for as many as 90% of all melanomas of the head and neck.
Approximately half of melanomas have the cancer-causing BRAF gene mutation, meaning it can be treated with the latest melanoma drugs.
[USPRwire, Sat Dec 06 2014] GBI Research, a leading business intelligence provider, has released its latest research report, "Melanoma Therapeutics Market to 2020 - Rising Prevalence and Evolving Treatment Algorithms to Drive Market Growth"