melodeon

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me·lo·de·on

 (mə-lō′dē-ən)
n.
A small harmonium.

[Probably alteration of melodium, from melody.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melodeon

(mɪˈləʊdɪən) or

melodion

n
1. (Instruments) a type of small accordion
2. (Instruments) a type of keyboard instrument similar to the harmonium
[C19: from German, from Melodie melody]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

me•lo•de•on

(məˈloʊ di ən)

n.
a small reed organ.
[1840–50, Amer.; < German, formed on Melodie melody; see accordion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He taught the weekly singing-school (then a feature of village life) in half a dozen neighboring towns, he played the violin and "called off" at dances, or evoked rich harmonies from church melodeons on Sundays.
She "carried" the alto by ear, danced without being taught, played the melodeon without knowing the notes.
I was glad to learn that our piano, our parlor organ, and our melodeon were to be the best instruments of the kind that could be had in the market.
They went clothed in steel and equipped with sword and lance and battle-axe, and if they couldn't persuade a person to try a sewing-machine on the installment plan, or a melodeon, or a barbed-wire fence, or a prohibition journal, or any of the other thousand and one things they canvassed for, they removed him and passed on.
It regularly attracts an ensemble of melodeons, English/Anglo concertinas, accordions, fiddles, whistles, recorders, mandolins and guitars.
Mel and Sue of La Muse will also be on hand with their mesmerising collection of fast-paced Breton tunes played on duelling melodeons.
Amongst the guitars, drums, keyboards, brass and woodwind, there's the off-kilter likes of shaky egg, thunder tube, kazoo, whistles, melodeons, bouzouki and bagpipes, plus percussion of a frying pan, glockenspiel, knives and forks, clockwork toys, megaphone scratching, stomp box, coal scuttle, party blowers, broomsticks and a ratchet!
The up-tempo Welcome To The Sparrow Club and t relaxed Random Ac Of Kindness are bot strong tracks but if you're not a fan of melodeons - a type button accordion - you'd best give this wide
Joining him in the band is a new generation of singers and musicians, all of whom have discovered the magic of Lark Rise and its words and music - Simon Care (melodeons, vocals, dance), Judy Dunlop (vocals), Ruth Angell (fiddle and vocals), Mark Hutchinson (guitar and vocals) and Guy Fletcher (fiddle, guitar, drums and vocal).