melody

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melody

musical sounds; harmony; tune; song
Not to be confused with:
malady – illness; affliction; complaint: He had a chronic malady that sapped all of his energy.; any undesirable or disordered condition: a social malady
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

mel·o·dy

 (mĕl′ə-dē)
n. pl. mel·o·dies
1. A pleasing succession or arrangement of sounds.
2. Musical quality: the melody of verse.
3. Music
a. A rhythmically organized sequence of single tones so related to one another as to make up a particular phrase or idea.
b. Structure with respect to the arrangement of single notes in succession.
c. The leading part or the air in a composition with accompaniment.
4. A poem suitable for setting to music or singing.

[Middle English melodie, from Old French, from Late Latin melōdia, from Greek melōidiā, singing, choral song : melos, tune + aoidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melody

(ˈmɛlədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Music, other) music
a. a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; tune
b. the horizontally represented aspect of the structure of a piece of music. Compare harmony4b
2. sounds that are pleasant because of tone or arrangement, esp words of poetry
[C13: from Old French, from Late Latin melōdia, from Greek melōidia singing, from melos song + -ōidia, from aoidein to sing]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mel•o•dy

(ˈmɛl ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. musical sounds in agreeable succession or arrangement.
2. a rhythmical succession of musical tones organized as a distinct phrase or sequence of phrases.
[1250–1300; Middle English melodie < Medieval Latin melōdia < Greek melōidía (choral) singing =mel- (see melic) + -ōid- (see ode) + -ia -y3]
mel′o•dy•less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

melody

  • grace note - An extra note for embellishment, not necessary for the harmony or melody.
  • absolute music, abstract music, pure music - Absolute music (abstract music, pure music) is music for its own sake—concerned only with structure, melody, harmony, and rhythm.
  • air - An expressive succession of musical sounds—a melody or tune.
  • melody - From Greek melos, "song," its early sense was "sweet music."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Melody

 of harpers: harpists collectivelyBk. of St. Albans, 1486.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melody - a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequencemelody - a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; "she was humming an air from Beethoven"
tucket, fanfare, flourish - (music) a short lively tune played on brass instruments; "he entered to a flourish of trumpets"; "her arrival was greeted with a rousing fanfare"
glissando - a rapid series of ascending or descending notes on the musical scale
roulade - (music) an elaborate run of several notes sung to one syllable
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
leitmotif, leitmotiv - a melodic phrase that accompanies the reappearance of a person or situation (as in Wagner's operas)
theme song - a melody that recurs and comes to represent a musical play or movie
signature tune, theme song, signature - a melody used to identify a performer or a dance band or radio/tv program
melodic theme, musical theme, theme, idea - (music) melodic subject of a musical composition; "the theme is announced in the first measures"; "the accompanist picked up the idea and elaborated it"
part, voice - the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part"
musical phrase, phrase - a short musical passage
2.melody - the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notesmelody - the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notes
musical perception - the auditory perception of musical sounds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

melody

noun
1. tune, song, theme, refrain, air, music, strain, descant, MLOD (S.M.S.) an easy melody with a frenetic beat
2. tunefulness, music, harmony, musicality, euphony, melodiousness, MLOD (S.M.S.) Her voice was full of melody.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

melody

noun
A pleasing succession of musical tones forming a usually brief aesthetic unit:
Obsolete: note.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
اللحْن الرَّئيسيلـَحْنٌنَغَم
мелодия
melodie
melodihovedstemme
melodio
melodiasävel
melodija
melódiadallam
laglaglína
メロディー旋律歌曲調べ
멜로디
melodia
melodingaimelodingasmelodingumas
melodijamelodija, tēma
melodija
melodijaмелодија
melodi
เสียงดนตรี
giai điệu

melody

[ˈmelədɪ] Nmelodía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

melody

[ˈmɛlədi] n (= tune) → mélodie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

melody

nMelodie f; (fig: of poetry etc) → Melodik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

melody

[ˈmɛlədɪ] nmelodia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

melody

(ˈmelədi) plural ˈmelodies noun
1. a tune. He played Irish melodies on the harp.
2. the principal part in a piece of harmonized music. The sopranos sang the melody, and the other voices added the harmony.
meˈlodic (-ˈlo-) adjective
of melody. a melodic style.
meˈlodious (ˈlou-) adjective
pleasing to the ear; tuneful. melodious tunes.
meˈlodiously adverb
meˈlodiousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

melody

لـَحْنٌ melodie melodi Melodie μελωδία melodía melodia mélodie melodija melodia メロディー 멜로디 melodie melodi melodia melodia мелодия melodi เสียงดนตรี melodi giai điệu 旋律
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Then, I said, if these and these only are to be used in our songs and melodies, we shall not want multiplicity of notes or a panharmonic scale?
And furthermore, the Prince had a nightingale, who could sing in such a manner that it seemed as though all sweet melodies dwelt in her little throat.
Before he left us, he showed us his gold watch which struck the hours, and a topaz ring, given him by some Russian nobleman who delighted in Negro melodies, and had heard d'Arnault play in New Orleans.
Some might expect the first melodies in this section to be those in the so-called Achtliederbuch of 1524, issued as Etlich Cristlich lider.
Volunteers underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scanning as they performed four tasks: listening to a sequence of noise bursts; listening to a series of unfamiliar, eight-note melodies; listening to the same melodies and determining whether the pitch of the second note was higher or lower than that of the first note; and listening to the melodies once more and noting whether the pitch of the last note rose or fell relative to the first note.
Yannis Constantinidis composed the 44 Children's Pieces on Greek Melodies in 1950 with the intention of providing Greek conservatory students with compositions that have a distinctly folk flavor, gradually increasing in technical difficulty and artistic breadth.
The need for a critical edition of the melodies of German Kirchenlieder was acknowledged at least as early as the middle nf the nineteenth century.
Lynch and his colleagues composed computer-generated, seven-note melodies based on Western major and minor scales and the Javanese pelog scale.
It is historically quite interesting to note just how often composers in those three time periods merely sketched out melodies, keyboard parts and percussion parts, fully expecting performers to "fill them in" according to accepted practices.
This CD-ROM contains more than 160 lessons covering everything from the basics through chord strumming, playing melodies and finger picking.
I think young students will enjoy the fun rhythms, tuneful melodies and the influence of jazz harmonies.
The most intriguing aspect of Godowsky's transcriptions evidenced in both the Schubert songs and Bach sonatas and suites is the contrapuntal layering of materials, derived from the original compositions, with overlapping and simultaneous statements of melodies, melodic fragments and motives.