memoir


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mem·oir

 (mĕm′wär′, -wôr′)
n.
1. An account of the personal experiences of an author.
2. often memoirs An autobiography.
3. A biography or biographical sketch.
4. A report, especially on a scientific or scholarly topic.
5. memoirs The report of the proceedings of a learned society.

[French mémoire, from Old French memoire, memory, from Latin memoria; see memory.]

mem′oir·ist n.

memoir

(ˈmɛmwɑː)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a biography or historical account, esp one based on personal knowledge
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an essay or monograph, as on a specialized topic
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) obsolete a memorandum
[C16: from French, from Latin memoria memory]
ˈmemoirist n

mem•oir

(ˈmɛm wɑr, -wɔr)

n.
1. a record of events based on the writer's personal observation.
2. Usu., memoirs.
a. an autobiography.
b. the published proceedings of an organization, as of a learned society.
3. a biography.
[1560–70; < French mémoire < Latin memoria]

memoir

A biography or historical account based on personal knowledge; stylistically, memoirs usually indicate fragments of autobiography rather than a complete retelling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.memoir - an account of the author's personal experiencesmemoir - an account of the author's personal experiences
autobiography - a biography of yourself
2.memoir - an essay on a scientific or scholarly topic
essay - an analytic or interpretive literary composition

memoir

noun account, life, record, register, journal, essay, biography, narrative, monograph He has just published a memoir in honour of his captain.

memoir

noun
A narrative of experiences undergone by the writer:
commentary (often used in plural), reminiscence (often used in plural).
Translations
mälestusteraamat
emlékiratmemoár

memoir

[ˈmemwɑːʳ] N
1. memoirs (= autobiography) → memorias fpl, autobiografía fsing
2. (= biographical note) → nota f biográfica
3. (= essay) → memoria f

memoir

[ˈmɛmwɑːr] nmémoire m

memoir

n
memoirs plMemoiren pl

memoir

[ˈmɛmwɑːʳ] n (essay) → saggio monografico; (biography) → nota biografica
References in classic literature ?
Last year he sent to me a memoir on this subject, with a request that I would forward it to Sir Charles Lyell, who sent it to the Linnean Society, and it is published in the third volume of the Journal of that Society.
The Flora of the Galapagos Archipelago is the subject of a separate memoir by him, in the 'Linnean Transactions.' The Reverend Professor Henslow has published a list of the plants collected by me at the Keeling Islands; and the Reverend J.
The younger members of the club, humouring the joke, sent a waiter for the 'Peerage'; and read aloud the memoir of the nobleman in question, for the Doctor's benefit-- with illustrative morsels of information interpolated by themselves.
Moncharmin declares, in his Memoirs, that the guest's nose was transparent: "long, thin and transparent" are his exact words.
"The 'Memoirs of an Alcoholic,'" I sneered--or, rather, John Barleycorn sneered; for he sat with me there at table in my pleasant, philanthropic jingle, and it is a trick of John Barleycorn to turn the smile to a sneer without an instant's warning.
We learn this from the memoirs of a man who was concerned in some few of these defeats and in many of these victories.
"My memoirs!" he began, with redoubled pride and dignity.
His title, schoolmaster, would very naturally seem derived from the name bestowed upon the harem itself, but some have surmised that the man who first thus entitled this sort of Ottoman whale, must have read the memoirs of Vidocq, and informed himself what sort of a country-schoolmaster that famous Frenchman was in his younger days, and what was the nature of those occult lessons he inculcated into some of his pupils.
With the exception of a vague de- scription, so I continued, till the other day, when you read me your memoirs. I hardly knew, at the time, whether to thank you or not for the sight of them, when I reflected that it was still dangerous, in Massachusetts, for honest men to tell their names!
If my poor Flatland friend retained the vigour of mind which he enjoyed when he began to compose these Memoirs, I should not now need to represent him in this preface, in which he desires, firstly, to return his thanks to his readers and critics in Spaceland, whose appreciation has, with unexpected celerity, required a second edition of his work; secondly, to apologize for certain errors and misprints (for which, however, he is not entirely responsible); and, thirdly, to explain one or two misconceptions.
"True, Laurence,'" replied Grandfather, smiling; "we must write a book with some such title as this: MEMOIRS OF MY OWN TIMES, BY GRANDFATHER'S CHAIR."
When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.