memoirs


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mem·oir

 (mĕm′wär′, -wôr′)
n.
1. An account of the personal experiences of an author.
2. often memoirs An autobiography.
3. A biography or biographical sketch.
4. A report, especially on a scientific or scholarly topic.
5. memoirs The report of the proceedings of a learned society.

[French mémoire, from Old French memoire, memory, from Latin memoria; see memory.]

mem′oir·ist n.

memoirs

(ˈmɛmwɑːz)
pl n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a collection of reminiscences about a period, series of events, etc, written from personal experience or special sources
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an autobiographical record
3. a collection or record, as of transactions of a society, etc

memoirs

memories
1. 'memoirs'

When someone writes their memoirs, they write a book about people and events that they remember.

He was busy writing his memoirs.
They're making a movie of his war memoirs.
2. 'memories'

You do not use 'memoirs' to refer to things that you remember about the past. The word you use is memories.

My memories of a London childhood are happy ones.
One of my earliest memories is of a total eclipse of the sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

memoirs

plural noun autobiography, diary, life story, life, experiences, memories, journals, recollections, reminiscences If you've read my memoirs, you'll know about it.
Quotations
"To write one's memoirs is to speak ill of everybody except oneself" [Marshal Pétain]
Translations
مُذَكَّرات
paměti
erindringermemoirer
elulugu
muistelmat
emlékiratok
æviminningar, sjálfsævisaga
atsiminimaimemuarai
autobiogrāfijamemuāri
pamäti
anılarhatırat

memoirs

[ˈmɛmwɑːrz] npl (= autobiographical account) → mémoires mpl
to write one's memoirs → écrire ses mémoiresmemo pad nbloc-notes m

memoirs

[ˈmɛmwɑːz] nplmemorie fpl

memoirs

(ˈmemwaːz) noun plural
a person's written account of his own life; an autobiography. When I retire, I'm going to write my memoirs.
References in classic literature ?
Moncharmin declares, in his Memoirs, that the guest's nose was transparent: "long, thin and transparent" are his exact words.
We learn this from the memoirs of a man who was concerned in some few of these defeats and in many of these victories.
And yet, if you please, my memoirs have long been written, but they shall not see the light until dust returns to dust.
Descending to particulars, each member of the club contributed his own little stock of scandal to the memoirs of the Countess.
His title, schoolmaster, would very naturally seem derived from the name bestowed upon the harem itself, but some have surmised that the man who first thus entitled this sort of Ottoman whale, must have read the memoirs of Vidocq, and informed himself what sort of a country-schoolmaster that famous Frenchman was in his younger days, and what was the nature of those occult lessons he inculcated into some of his pupils.
With the exception of a vague de- scription, so I continued, till the other day, when you read me your memoirs.
If my poor Flatland friend retained the vigour of mind which he enjoyed when he began to compose these Memoirs, I should not now need to represent him in this preface, in which he desires, firstly, to return his thanks to his readers and critics in Spaceland, whose appreciation has, with unexpected celerity, required a second edition of his work; secondly, to apologize for certain errors and misprints (for which, however, he is not entirely responsible); and, thirdly, to explain one or two misconceptions.
True, Laurence,'" replied Grandfather, smiling; "we must write a book with some such title as this: MEMOIRS OF MY OWN TIMES, BY GRANDFATHER'S CHAIR.
When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.
For a long time after it was ushered into this world of sorrow and trouble, by the parish surgeon, it remained a matter of considerable doubt whether the child would survive to bear any name at all; in which case it is somewhat more than probable that these memoirs would never have appeared; or, if they had, that being comprised within a couple of pages, they would have possessed the inestimable merit of being the most concise and faithful specimen of biography, extant in the literature of any age or country.
She ran the risk of wasting another minute or two, and went on with the memoirs of Tommie.
In his memoirs he piously thanks the Giver of all Good for remembering him in his needs and delivering sundry such cargoes into his hands at times when only special providences could have relieved him.