memorialist


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me·mo·ri·al·ist

 (mə-môr′ē-ə-lĭst)
n.
1. A person who writes memoirs.
2. A person who writes or signs a memorial.

memorialist

(mɪˈmɔːrɪəlɪst)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who writes or presents a memorial
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of a memoir or memoirs

me•mo•ri•al•ist

(məˈmɔr i ə lɪst, -ˈmoʊr-)

n.
1. a person who writes memorials.
2. a person who writes memoirs.
[1700–10]
References in classic literature ?
Mechanicians, natural philosophers, soldiers, sailors, petitioners, memorialists, people with grievances, people who wanted to prevent grievances, people who wanted to redress grievances, jobbing people, jobbed people, people who couldn't get rewarded for merit, and people who couldn't get punished for demerit, were all indiscriminately tucked up under the foolscap paper of the Circumlocution Office.
Indeed, memorial excellence is so unfamiliar that the closest many people can come to understanding it is to negate the familiar imaginative model and think of the memorialist as being unimaginative: he is the bore, the bureaucrat, the bourgeois, etc.
I've remained a memorialist of this profession in all its qualities.
His father died a natural death, but his grandparents were murdered by the Nazis, as were other relatives who did not flee Drohobycz in time (Drohobycz, incidentally was home to that other filial memorialist, Bruno Schulz).
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was designed by Maya Lin with supreme memorialist intuition, though she had no experience of the Vietnam conflict, having been too young when it tore the nation to bits, nor had she lost anyone who meant something to her in the war.
It also allows the memorialist a chance to push himself and his beautiful language forward as the center of attention.
A narrator who first appears to be a historian or memorialist, for instance, may fall out of the genre by resorting to mind-reading techniques, or a narratorial personality may emerge and disappear in third-person narration, destabilizing through this oscillation the value of the creative/expressive function.
My relationship with my mother eventually turned "flummox" into a psychoanalytic category all its own, something combining Oedipus and mawkishness, guilt and love so intertwined it can only be called "glove." She turned away, but she always turned away so gracefully that my problem with my self-giveaways was never resolved, as though in turning away, I her long lost memorialist, am perpetually turning into a column of salt, mining her and myself into a quarry of life-long digressions.
-- vast amounts of whisky, in which in the end his considerable talents drowned, and was consumed by an immense bitterness, having, as he confided to his friend, that doughty Edwardian memorialist Edgar Jepson, spent two thousand pounds on a lady he loved, only to come home one night to find a strange cigar-butt in her bedroom.
23 Jacques-Emile Blanche (1861-1942) was not only the fashionable portrait painter we know from his portraits of Henry James, Proust, Cocteau, Gide, and others, he was also an art critic and a memorialist of his time (Propos dans l'Atelier, Cahiers d'un Artiste).
Under the shadow of a potential Bourbon universal monarchy encompassing both the French and Spanish dominions, argued one memorialist, the Scots settlement provided strategic and financial defences and the way to `be ready at hand to seize on Antichrists pouch' (the Spanish bullion mines in the Americas).
Which means, of course, that, ambitious and prolific as she is, Ferre's hispanophilia does not preclude an accomplished career in English as well, and therein lies her personal dilemma: she is a perfect embodiment of the Janus-like identity Puerto Rico emanates today, a mythical creature with two heads set back to back, impossibly "loyal to two fatherlands," as the memorialist Bernardo Vega once put it.