menservants


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men·ser·vants

 (mĕn′sûr′vənts)
n.
Plural of manservant.
Translations

menservants

[ˈmensɜːrvənts] npl of manservantmen's room n (mainly US) (= toilets) the men's room → les toilettes fpl pour hommes
References in classic literature ?
Behind him stood the aide-de-camp, the doctors, and the menservants; the men and women had separated as in church.
M'Leod, while tall menservants and maidservants took away the tennis and tea things.
But if that servant says to himself, 'My master is delayed in coming,' and begins to beat the menservants and the maidservants, to eat and drink and get drunk, then that servant's master will come on an unexpected day and at an unknown hour and will punish him severely and assign him a place with the unfaithful.
Those in authority who 'beat the menservants and the maidservants will be punished severely by the Master when he comes.' Those who are persecuted take comfort in Jesus' words: 'Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness for theirs is the kingdom of heaven' (Mt.
But he also notes somewhat casually the darker aspects of rabbinical wisdom: misogyny ("When a man talks too much to his wife, he causes evil to himself, disregards the words of the Torah, and in the end will inherit Gehinnom [Hell]"); contempt for the physical world ("The more flesh, the more worms; the more possessions, the more worry; the more wives, the more witchcraft; the more maidservants, the more lewdness; the more menservants, the more theft"); and a kind of fanatical, elitist intellectualism ("One who does not study deserves to die").
This is the only year for which there are systematically gathered figures on the servant population, but, as the governor stressed, these figures referred only to "white menservants" (Atkins 1680:503; Dunn 1969:7; Dunn 1972:88).
One can reconstruct from these statistics the regional patterns of the cod economy, from the numbers of ships and boats and men fishing and trading to the distribution, between Placentia and Bonavista, of year-round inhabitants, the masters, menservants, mistresses, women servants, and children.
Would the livery of menservants in grand European mansions, or chauffeurs, serve anything more than enhancing the opulence of their masters?
Abraham and others were given menservants and maidservants, like any English country gentleman.
Many argued that menservants, particularly footmen, were a luxury and should be taxed, but that maidservants did essential work and were retained not just by the elite but by the poor.
He employed a string of Japanese menservants during the last dozen years of his life, and he developed close friendships with each of them.
She divides her subject into ten areas: recruitment; conditions of employment; duties of menservants and then of women servants; servants' accommodation and clothing; servants' food and drink; the recreations offered; relations with employers; relations with other servants and their own families; servants' health, old age and death.