mental retardation


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mental retardation

n. Often Offensive
Intellectual disability.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mental retardation

n
(Psychiatry) psychiatry the condition of having a low intelligence quotient (below 70)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

men′tal retarda′tion


n.
a developmental disorder characterized in varying degrees by a subnormal ability to learn, a substantially low IQ, and impaired social adjustment.
[1900–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mental retardation

Below-average intellectual ability resulting from genetic defect, brain injury, or disease, and usually present from birth or early infancy.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mental retardation - lack of normal development of intellectual capacities
stupidity - a poor ability to understand or to profit from experience
mental defectiveness, abnormality - retardation sufficient to fall outside the normal range of intelligence
mental deficiency, moronity - mild mental retardation
amentia, idiocy - extreme mental retardation
imbecility - retardation more severe than a moron but not as severe as an idiot
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were significant differences between students with learning disabilities or mental retardation and non-disabled peers.
Career development is vital to a quality lifestyle for people with all forms of mental retardation. However, existing research on the career development of people with moderate to severe mental retardation focuses on occupational choice rather than career development (Rumrill & Roessler, 1999).
The participants were in grades 9-12 and were representative of students with learning disabilities (LDs), mild mental retardation (MMR), and emotional disabilities (EDs), as well as those without disabilities.
The major challenges facing the field of rehabilitation regarding persons with mental retardation are the expansion of employment opportunities and the preparation of qualified workers (Walls & Fullmer, 1997).
Negative social responses to persons with mental retardation and mental illness have persisted across generations despite improved care, legislative support, and a more sophisticated medical understanding of the causes and origins of these disabilities.
But according to doctors, Mr Kang'ethe's children suffer from mental retardation, a condition that could have resulted from a number of factors including genetics, congenital abnormalities and idiopathic (unknown) causes.Ms Angela Muthoni, a psychiatric nurse at Murang'a County Referral Hospital, told the Nation that the case of Mr Kang'ethe's children is that of mental retardation that could have occurred during birth or due to unknown causes.
Fifteen children with mild mental retardation were randomly allocated to receive either an 8-week intervention of the learning program with visual aids (n = 6) and learning program only (n = 5).
A study was conducted to investigate job satisfaction among 35 male and female teachers of students with mental retardation and 300 male and female teachers working in public education sector.9 The data were collected on a fifty-item scale containing five major factors including satisfaction with one's monthly pay, satisfaction of teachers' needs, the nature of work and general environment in the school, the kind of administration and the social position.
The aim of investigating a child with mental retardation or developmental delay is to reach etiologic diagnosis.
(4) Amongst the subtypes of mental retardation, mild mental retardation is the most common, affecting about 85%; moderate mental retardation 10%; severe mental retardation about 3-4% and profound mental retardation about 1-2%.
Mental retardation is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV [10] as 'significantly sub-average general intellectual functioning (having an [intelligence quotient] IQ [less than or equal to]70) that is accompanied by significant limitations in adaptive functioning in at least two of the following skills areas: communication, self-care, home living, social/interpersonal skills, use of community resources, self-direction, functional academic skills, work, leisure, health and safety' The onset must occur before age 18 years.
The Kansas Inventory of Parental Perceptions was used to assess mothers' perceptions on the impact of caring for a child with mental retardation. Positive contributions, social comparisons with others, understanding of disability and perception of control were assessed.

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