mentalistic


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men·tal·ism

(mĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Feats of mental power that are not explainable by science, such as telepathy and mind reading.
2. Philosophy
a. Any of several doctrines holding that mental phenomena are real and interact with the real world and are not necessarily reducible to the functioning of the brain.
b. A doctrine that the justification of any belief lies ultimately in the mind of the person holding the belief.

men′tal·ist n.
men′tal·is′tic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, the second-generation embodied understandings of cognition disavow one normative and mentalistic way of accounting for thought processes.
(3) I do not go the whole way with Brandom in claiming that intentionality is a linguistic, rather than mentalistic, operation.
That is, the Q samples and conditions of instruction of Q methodology do not reveal mentalistic points of view; rather, the subjective points of view are inseparable from the experimental conditions (see Watts, 2011).
Functionalists, on the other hand, tend to embrace a cognitive approach which makes use of data from behavioral studies in order to derive mentalistic information processing theories (Tulving, 1999).
This intuition is reflected in our daily mentalistic discourse such as, for example, when I explain my daughter's decision to postpone her planned picnic in the park due to bad weather by saying that she believes the rain would ruin the picnic and desires to have a good time with her friends.
Following the principles of the teleological account [12] or the mentalistic account [14], it is unlikely that a repeated presentation of the unusual action in the hands-occupied condition has any effect on infants' imitation rates: Since the model is still physically constrained, she still cannot use her hands.
In artificial intelligence, for instance, agents can be characterized using mentalistic or emotional notions such as knowledge, belief, intentions and/or obligations.
know-how that is prior to his own mentalistic theory of [meaning.sub.L],
Hunger is a state of organic imbalance constituting need, not, however, in a mentalistic sense, but as a condition of active uneasiness which manifests itself in search for foodstuffs....
Povinelli, "The Comparative Delusion: The 'Behavioristic'/'Mentalistic' Dichotomy in Comparative Theory of Mnd Research," chap.
Furthermore, as far as the space has three dimensions: (1) width, (2) length, and (3) depth, human species have three major dimensions too: (1) somatic, (2) socialistic, and (3) mentalistic. Somatic characteristics are compositions of natural genes, cells, and proteins (Parhizgar & Parhizgar, 2015).
"In short, orthodox quantum mechanics is Cartesian dualistic at the pragmatic/operational level, but mentalistic on the ontological level."--Henry Stapp (2009, p.