mepacrine


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Related to mepacrine: Atabrine

mepacrine

(ˈmɛpəkrɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) Brit a drug, mepacrine dihydrochloride, one of the first synthetic substitutes for quinine, formerly widely used to treat malaria but now largely replaced by chloroquine. Formula: C23H30ClN3O.2HCl.2H2O. US name: quinacrine
[C20: from me(thyl) + pa(ludism + a)cr(id)ine]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mepacrine - a drug (trade name Atabrine) used to treat certain worm infestations and once used to treat malariamepacrine - a drug (trade name Atabrine) used to treat certain worm infestations and once used to treat malaria
antimalarial, antimalarial drug - a medicinal drug used to prevent or treat malaria
anthelminthic, anthelmintic, helminthic, vermifuge - a medication capable of causing the evacuation of parasitic intestinal worms
References in periodicals archive ?
One patient had been sick for about 3.5 years prior to the mepacrine. Her top symptoms included burning of the peripheral nerves, itching, prickly arms, legs and torso and at its worst brain burning when she would eat ANY food (even low histamine).
Atabrine: A synthetic antibiotic developed by the German pharmaceutical company Bayer in 1931, Atabrine (the trade name for mepacrine, also called quinacrine) was the first manmade substitute for quinine, the anti-malarial drug of choice at that time.
In the mast cell degranulation experiment, the order of [IC.sub.50] values of 17.6, 17.9, 22.3, 53.7, and 71.6 [micro]M was assignable to compounds 125, 97, positive control mepacrine, 77, and 20, respectively, against the release of [beta]-glucuronidase [18].
Collins, "Binge ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in rat organotypic brain slice cultures: effects of PLA2 inhibitor mepacrine and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)," Neurochemical Research, vol.
* Up to and including WWII troops based in mosquito-infested areas were given daily doses of Mepacrine to combat malaria.
These drugs could be divided into two main types: acridines, which include mepacrine (quinacrine), used since 1930, and quinoleines, which include chloroquine (amodiaquine), proguanil, chlorproguanil, pyrimethamine, primaquine, quinocide, pamaquine.