mercantile


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Related to mercantile: mercantile system, mercantile agent

mer·can·tile

 (mûr′kən-tēl′, -tīl′, -tĭl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to merchants or trade.
2. Of or relating to mercantilism.

[French, from Italian, from mercante, merchant, from Latin mercāns, mercant-, from present participle of mercārī, to trade, from merx, merc-, merchandise, goods.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mercantile

(ˈmɜːkənˌtaɪl)
adj
1. (Commerce) of, relating to, or characteristic of trade or traders; commercial
2. (Economics) of or relating to mercantilism
[C17: from French, from Italian, from mercante merchant]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mer•can•tile

(ˈmɜr kənˌtil, -ˌtaɪl, -tɪl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to merchants or trade; commercial.
2. of or pertaining to mercantilism.
[1635–45; < French < Italian, =mercant(e) (< Latin mercāns, present participle of mercāri to trade; see merchant) + -ile -ile2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mercantile - of or relating to the economic system of mercantilismmercantile - of or relating to the economic system of mercantilism; "mercantile theories"; "mercantile system"
2.mercantile - profit orientedmercantile - profit oriented; "a commercial book"; "preached a mercantile and militant patriotism"- John Buchan; "a mercenary enterprise"; "a moneymaking business"
commercial - connected with or engaged in or sponsored by or used in commerce or commercial enterprises; "commercial trucker"; "commercial TV"; "commercial diamonds"
3.mercantile - relating to or characteristic of trade or traders; "the mercantile North was forging ahead"- Van Wyck Brooks
commercial - connected with or engaged in or sponsored by or used in commerce or commercial enterprises; "commercial trucker"; "commercial TV"; "commercial diamonds"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

mercantile

adjective
1. commercial, business, trade, trading, merchant the emergence of a new mercantile class
2. profit-making, materialistic, capitalistic, money-orientated the urban society and its mercantile values
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

mercantile

[ˈmɜːkəntaɪl] ADJmercantil
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mercantile

[ˈmɜːrkəntaɪl] adj [class, nation] → marchand(e); [law] → commercial(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mercantile

adjHandels-; nation alsoHandel treibend; the mercantile marinedie Handelsmarine
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mercantile

[ˈmɜːknˌtaɪl] adjmercantile; (law) → commerciale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Within the lax limits of mercantile morality, Richard Turlington had a conscience.
Meanwhile he held on to his modest position in a mercantile house in New Orleans, where an equal familiarity with English, French and Spanish gave him no small value as a clerk and correspondent.
The story of "old Prue," in the second volume, was an incident that fell under the personal observation of a brother of the writer, then collecting-clerk to a large mercantile house, in New Orleans.
I had not walked a hundred yards before I noticed the name of "Van Brandt" inscribed on the window-blinds of a house which appeared to be devoted to mercantile purposes.
Miss Hawkins was the youngest of the two daughters of a Bristol merchant, of course, he must be called; but, as the whole of the profits of his mercantile life appeared so very moderate, it was not unfair to guess the dignity of his line of trade had been very moderate also.
The Shipping and Mercantile Gazette, the Lloyd's List, the Packet-Boat, and the Maritime and Colonial Review, all papers devoted to insurance companies which threatened to raise their rates of premium, were unanimous on this point.
In the widening of the shores sinking low in the gray, smoky distances the greatness of the sea receives the mercantile fleet of good ships that London sends out upon the turn of every tide.
In the summer of 1874 I was in Liverpool, whither I had gone on business for the mercantile house of Bronson & Jarrett, New York.
On the death of his father, Ralph Nickleby, who had been some time before placed in a mercantile house in London, applied himself passionately to his old pursuit of money-getting, in which he speedily became so buried and absorbed, that he quite forgot his brother for many years; and if, at times, a recollection of his old playfellow broke upon him through the haze in which he lived--for gold conjures up a mist about a man, more destructive of all his old senses and lulling to his feelings than the fumes of charcoal--it brought along with it a companion thought, that if they were intimate he would want to borrow money of him.
you'll find nothing gone but your money, and the jewels, and a few little trifles I thought it advisable to take into my own possession, lest your mercantile spirit should be tempted to turn them into gold.
Those discerning citizens are well aware that the mechanic and manufacturing arts furnish the materials of mercantile enterprise and industry.
A landed interest, a manufacturing interest, a mercantile interest, a moneyed interest, with many lesser interests, grow up of necessity in civilized nations, and divide them into different classes, actuated by different sentiments and views.