mercery


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to mercery: Mercury dime

mer·cer

 (mûr′sər)
n. Chiefly British
A dealer in textiles, especially silks.

[Middle English, from Old French mercier, trader, from merz, merchandise, from Latin merx, merc-, merchandise.]

mer′cer·y (mûrs′rē, mûr′sə-rē) n.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It was indeed I and the black cook, both from the ship `La Rose de Gloire,' of Southampton, who did set upon the Flanders merchant and rob him of his spicery and his mercery, for which, as we well know, you hold a warrant against us."
"I remember many trips to the mercery floor of [department store] Myer in Melbourne to buy fabric.
Promoter: New Look Retailers Limited, Mercery Road, Weymouth, Dorset, DT3 5HJ.
(28) Regional statutes from the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries classify meulequins with mercery and woven goods.
(8) See Erler, Ecclesiastical London, 365, citing Anne Sutton, The Mercery of London: Trade, Goods, and People, 1130-1578 (Aldershot, 2005), 387-8.
Sutton, The Mercery of London: Trade, Goods, and People, 1130-1578 (Burlington, Vt.: Aldershot, 2005), 29.
On the other hand, the trade list of the mercery of John Pares in Rochdale, Lancashire, included 'Itm three dossen of trumpes all save twoe trumpes' at 8d, in 1623, which is apparently a good deal cheaper per item.