merchantry


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merchantry

(ˈmɜːtʃəntrɪ)
n
(Commerce) the business of purchasing and selling commodities

merchantry

1. merchants collectively.
2. the business of commerce or trade.
See also: Trade

Merchantry

 merchants collectively, 1862.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The technology relationship between Modell's and each supplier is managed via Merchantry's Supplier Hub software, enabling:
In this "hybrid cultural zone," the norms and imaginations of the merchantry, intelligentsia, and petty bourgeoisie intersect, a fact that turns the dachas into a fascinating object of literature.
New York, NY, May 06, 2013 --(PR.com)-- Merchantry, an online marketplace technology provider, today announced that it has received $7 million in Series B growth capital led by Kite Ventures.
(10) They also forged ties with the merchantry through joint membership in a whole range of economic enterprises and journalistic work.
For both men and women, there was a significant number of recruits from the merchantry and townsmen, while for women there was a higher percentage of recruits from both the aristocracy and the peasantry.
It describes familial relations among the merchantry and submission to the head of household.
The 1785 legislation drew the lines between the estates more precisely, turning ennoblement into a "three-generation process" even for the relatively successful sections of the merchantry. (18) The meritocratic rationale for ennoblement did not come at the expense of pride in lineage: the ethos of the Catherinian era remained ambiguous--if also ambivalent--on this point.
(13) The family had its roots in the Moscow merchantry at a time when the merchant soslovie was beginning to undergo a significant cultural transformation.
The smiths were constituted as a special estate of their own, their privileges reconfirmed and extended by Catherine II in 1782, with the right to rise into the merchantry (kupechestvo).
The two articles that follow Zakharova's are both on the Russian merchantry. Klaus Heller challenges the pre- and postrevolutionary stereotype of the Russian merchantry as greedy and amoral by examining the memoirs of the early 20th-century merchant Pavel A.
Southern Renaissance also emerged through commerce: Venetian and Genoese merchantry, alongside Florentine bankers, paid for, along with personal pleasures, all the luxury of architectural, sculptural and pictural prosperity of neo-heathen culture of Renaissance Italy.
They had nobility, clergy, merchantry, and peasantry but not a distinct class in society to show others a "better way" and to think about the "common good." Peter I changed this situation in Gasprinskiy's opinion by giving "orders for the education and intellectual development of his country" by opening "necessary schools," and by bringing the "sciences and knowledge of Europe to Russia." This gave birth to the Russian intelligentsia, Gasprinskiy concludes, and already by Catherine Us time, its intelligentsia enabled Russia to occupy a place among the "educated" and "powerful" nations of the world.