merchet


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merchet

(ˈmɜːtʃɪt)
n
(Historical Terms) (in feudal England) a fine paid by a tenant, esp a villein, to his lord for allowing the marriage of his daughter
[C13: from Anglo-French, literally: market]
References in periodicals archive ?
"This incident embarrassed France," Jean-Dominique Merchet, working for French daily L'Opinion, told Anadolu Agency (AA), and added that Saudi Arabia was a strategic ally for his country.
French defence expert Jean-Dominique Merchet, said: "I would be astonished if France was prepared to send troops back to Afghanistan.
The well-regarded French defense journalist JeanDominique Merchet reported that the GIGN detachment arrived an hour after the assault to retake the hotel had ended, and that the response involved members of France's Commandement des Operations Speciales (COS) dispatched from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
(65.) Jean-Dominique Merchet, "Libye: La facture des missiles de croisiere Scalp s'eleve (deja) a plus de neuf millions d'euros," Marianne2.fr, 6 April 2011, http://www.marianne2.fr/blogsecretdefense/Libye-la-facture -des-missiles-de-croisiere-Scalp-s-eleve-deja-a-plus-de-neuf -millions-d-euros_a212.html.
"It's peanuts," said Jean Dominique Merchet, editor of blog secretdefense on military affairs.
WORDS WITH ROOTS IN WALES PENGUIN The earliest use of penguin can apparently be traced back to Wales, says the OED, with pen meaning head and gwyn meaning white MERCH The Welsh word 'merch' (daughter) was the origin of the English word 'merchet', the dowry paid in return for the right to give his daughter in marriage CWTCH Welsh for a cuddle.
Merchet is given as another example in the Oxford English of a word with Welsh origins - in the 13th century this was a fee paid by a tennant to his overlord to allow his daughter to marry.
Implementing it any further would lead to more waste, powerlessness and renouncement." With his opening words, Jean-Dominique Merchet, a specialist in defence policy for the French daily Liberation, sets the tone of this volume.
His trainer Jean-Marie Merchet admits the Paris firefighter is an outside bet for the title, but said: "We say impossible is not French!"
Servile status was inherited `by blood' and the tenant's children were liable to servile dues, such as chevage, for living outside the manor, or merchet, for a woman's marriage.(45) Not every child was actually charged these fines,(46) but this does not undermine the point that they were liable to be charged because of their father's tenure and status.
For historical perspectives on the concept of women as property, see, for example, Eleanor Searle, Merchet and Women's Property Rights in Medieval England, in 2 Women and the Law, supra note 25.5, at 45 (discussing the common medieval custom of giving payment to a manorial lord by a young woman's family to secure "his permission before she might marry"); Susan Treggiari, Women as Property in the Early Roman Empire, in 2 Women and the Law, supra note 255, at 7 (describing the purchase, sale, and sexual exploitation of women slaves in ancient Rome); see also Post, supra note 25, at 289-96 (discussing similarities between slavery and marriage under ancient and more modern law).
See Jean-Dominique Merchet, "AQMI: l'otage Michel Germaneau est mort de maladie, faute de medicaments," Marianne, January 10, 2011.