meritorious


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mer·i·to·ri·ous

 (mĕr′ĭ-tôr′ē-əs)
adj.
Deserving reward or praise; having merit.

[Middle English, from Latin meritōrius, earning money, from meritus, past participle of merēre, to earn; see merit.]

mer′i·to′ri·ous·ly adv.
mer′i·to′ri·ous·ness n.

meritorious

(ˌmɛrɪˈtɔːrɪəs)
adj
praiseworthy; showing merit
[C15: from Latin meritōrius earning money]
ˌmeriˈtoriously adv
ˌmeriˈtoriousness n

mer•i•to•ri•ous

(ˌmɛr ɪˈtɔr i əs, -ˈtoʊr-)

adj.
deserving praise, reward, esteem, etc.; praiseworthy.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin meritōrius on hire]
mer`i•to′ri•ous•ly, adv.
mer`i•to′ri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.meritorious - deserving reward or praisemeritorious - deserving reward or praise; "a lifetime of meritorious service"; "meritorious conduct"
worthy - having worth or merit or value; being honorable or admirable; "a worthy fellow"; "a worthy cause"

meritorious

meritorious

adjective
Translations
جَدير بالتَّقْدير
záslužný
fortjenstfuld
virîingarverîur
övgüye değer

meritorious

[ˌmerɪˈtɔːrɪəs] ADJmeritorio

meritorious

adj, meritoriously
advlobenswert

meritorious

[ˌmɛrɪˈtɔːriəs] adj (frm) (deed, service) → meritorio/a

merit

(ˈmerit) noun
1. the quality of worth, excellence or praiseworthiness. He reached his present position through merit.
2. a good point or quality. His speech had at least the merit of being short.
verb
to deserve as reward or punishment. Your case merits careful consideration.
ˌmeriˈtorious (-ˈtoː-) adjective
deserving reward or praise. a meritorious performance.
References in classic literature ?
The one idea that had ever got through poor Marek's thick head was that all exertion was meritorious.
Such behaviour as this, so exactly the reverse of her own, appeared no more meritorious to Marianne, than her own had seemed faulty to her.
In course of time he'll come back again on our hands, like a bad shilling; more chances will fall in his way, as a necessary consequence of his meritorious imbecility.
Creakle), having subsided, Twenty Seven stood in the midst of us, as if he felt himself the principal object of merit in a highly meritorious museum.
In point of meritorious character, the two things seemed about equal.
One man whom I sent to America made his fortune, but he was not a social democrat; he was a clerk who had embezzled, and who applied to me for assistance under the impression that I considered it rather meritorious to rob the till of a capitalist.
They might even entertain a preference to some other person, at the very moment they were assenting to the one proposed, because there might be no positive ground of opposition to him; and they could not be sure, if they withheld their assent, that the subsequent nomination would fall upon their own favorite, or upon any other person in their estimation more meritorious than the one rejected.
She then adopted the submission of a slave, and regarded it as a meritorious deed to accept the degradation in which her husband placed her.
I have three friends who are more meritorious and more worthy--"
No," said Monte Cristo, "which is precisely the reason which renders your kindness more meritorious, -- it is in the country.
Render to him, then, the last service he can by any possibility ask of you, and your work will be all the more meritorious.
When this tale is told, I propose to lecture on the subject, to which all the editors in the country will receive the usual free tickets, when the world cannot fail of knowing quite as much, at least, as these meritorious public servants.