mesa

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Me·sa

 (mā′sə)
A city of south-central Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix.

me·sa

 (mā′sə)
n.
A broad, flat-topped elevation with one or more clifflike sides, common in the southwest United States.

[Spanish, table, mesa, from Old Spanish, table, from Latin mēnsa.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mesa

(ˈmeɪsə)
n
(Physical Geography) a flat tableland with steep edges, common in the southwestern US
[from Spanish: table]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

me•sa

(ˈmeɪ sə)

n., pl. -sas.
a land formation, less extensive than a plateau, having steep walls and a relatively flat top: common in arid and semiarid parts of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico.
[1750–60, Amer.; < Sp: table < Latin mēnsa]

Me•sa

(ˈmeɪ sə)

n.
a city in central Arizona, near Phoenix. 344,764.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·sa

(mā′sə)
An area of high land with a flat top and two or more steep, cliff-like sides. Mesas are larger than buttes and smaller than plateaus, and are common in the southwest United States.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mesa

A relatively small plateau capped by resistant horizontal rocks.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mesa - flat tableland with steep edgesmesa - flat tableland with steep edges; "the tribe was relatively safe on the mesa but they had to descend into the valley for water"
plateau, tableland - a relatively flat highland
2.Mesa - a city in Arizona just to the east of Phoenix; originally a suburb of Phoenix
Arizona, Grand Canyon State, AZ - a state in southwestern United States; site of the Grand Canyon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Tafelberg

mesa

[ˈmeɪsə] N (US) → colina f, baja duna f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mesa

nTafelberg m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mesa

[ˈmeɪsə] n (tableland) → mesa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
They had no wars and had always lived in peace and harmony, menaced only by the larger carniv-ora of the island, until my kind had come under a crea-ture called Hooja, and attacked and killed them when they chanced to descend from their natural fortresses to visit their fellows upon other lofty mesas.
Presently, however, we topped the thing and stood upon the level mesa which crowned it.
"Captain," he said, "for the last half-hour three men have been standing out there on the mesa." He pointed in the direction taken by the stranger.
Still climbing, although he paused often from sheer physical weakness, they scaled forest-clad heights until they emerged on a naked mesa or tableland.
With a body of which he was scarcely aware, for even the pain had been exhausted out of it, and with a bright clear brain that accommodated him to a quiet ecstasy of sheer lucidness of thought, he lay back on the lurching litter and watched the fading of the passing world, beholding for the last time the breadfruit tree before the devil- devil house, the dim day beneath the matted jungle roof, the gloomy gorge between the shouldering mountains, the saddle of raw limestone, and the mesa of black volcanic sand.
In the middle was a narrow table of teak on trestle legs, with two supporting bars of iron, of the kind called in Spain mesa de hieraje.
It gave us a rather rough climb to the summit, but finally we stood upon the level mesa which stretched back for several miles to the mountain range.