meseems

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me·seems

 (mē-sēmz′)
intr.v. Past tense me·seemed Archaic
It seems to me.

[Middle English me semeth : me, to me; see me + semeth, third person sing. present tense of semen, to seem; see seem.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

meseems

(mɪˈsiːmz)
vb, past meseemed
(tr; takes a clause as object) archaic it seems to me
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

me•seems

(miˈsimz)

v. impers.; pt. me•seemed. Archaic.
it seems to me.
[1350–1400; Middle English me semeth]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Meseemed a cloud enveloped us, shining, dense, firm and polished, like a diamond smitten by the sun.
Meseemed it were a dear delight In such a burg as that to dwell, And ever move among and see Those dwellings wrought so wonderly.
Lewis's diction in these poems leans toward the archaic, calling to mind some of the language he used in his unfinished 1916 prose romance titled "The Quest of Bleheris." Lewis's use of archaic words in "Bleheris" such as "sate;' "inasmuchas,' "bransles," and "ballades" suggests his efforts to mimic a medieval romance; when we turn to "Early Poems," we find similar word choices, including "methinks," "fain," "wast," "meseemed," "paynim," and "firth." In addition, poems such as "My Western Garden;' which appears to be a clumsy attempt to mimic Anglo-Saxon verse, reflect experiments with alliteration.