meshuga


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Related to meshuga: Meshuggah

me·shu·ga

also me·shug·ga  (mə-sho͝og′ə)
adj. Slang
Crazy; senseless.

[Yiddish meshuge, from Hebrew məšuggā', participle of šugga', to be mad; see šgʕ in Semitic roots.]

meshuga

(mɪˈʃʊɡə)
adj
crazy
[from Hebrew]

me•shu•ga

(məˈʃʊg ə)

adj. Slang.
crazy; insane.
[1880–85; < Yiddish meshuge < Hebrew məshuggā‘]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.meshuga - senselessmeshuga - senseless; crazy      
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
impractical - not practical; not workable or not given to practical matters; "refloating the ship proved impractical because of the expense"; "he is intelligent but too impractical for commercial work"; "an impractical solution"
Translations
mesjokke
References in periodicals archive ?
Rick Perry first held office as a Democrat (his CV does not emphasize his energetic support for the presidential campaign of AI Gore) and Texas did not go all meshuga Republican until the 1990s.
"America is more than just Washington or one leader," he said, calling Trump "meshuga" -- Yiddish for "crazy" -- for deciding to withdraw from the Paris accord.
It might seem meshuga -- crazy -- to stage a beloved musical in a language that most of the audience won't understand.
Meshuga! But for my father being a farmer was preferable to working as a baker's helper in the basement of Macy's which he did for four years after coming to America in flight from the tsar's army.
The Ethiopian Consul General in Dubai, Meshuga Arta Moach, was speaking after the death of 25-year-old Azeri Abebe, last Thursday, from injuries sustained in the blast at her employer's home in Dubai.
She's driving me meshuga with all her memos to Schultz insisting we no longer give the children graham crackers after recess and instead provide granola bars and dried fruit.
An intense man with deep eyes, a full, dark beard and a perpetually troubled-looking brow, Makuch peppers his speech with Hebrew and Yiddish words such as "shalom" and "meshuga;" he has been asked more times than he can remember what it means for a non-Jew to run a Jewish festival for an audience mainly composed of other non-Jews.