messenger RNA


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Related to messenger RNA: DNA, ribosomal RNA

messenger RNA

n. Abbr. mRNA
The form of RNA that mediates the transfer of genetic information from the cell nucleus to ribosomes in the cytoplasm, where it serves as a template for protein synthesis. It is synthesized from a DNA template during the process of transcription.

messenger RNA

n
(Biochemistry) biochem a form of RNA, transcribed from a single strand of DNA, that carries genetic information required for protein synthesis from DNA to the ribosomes. Sometimes shortened to: mRNA See also transfer RNA, genetic code

messenger RNA


n.
a molecule of RNA that is synthesized in the nucleus from a DNA template and then enters the cytoplasm, where its genetic code specifies the amino acid sequence for protein synthesis. Abbr.: mRNA
[1960–65]

mes·sen·ger RNA

(mĕs′ən-jər)
See under RNA.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.messenger RNA - the template for protein synthesismessenger RNA - the template for protein synthesis; the form of RNA that carries information from DNA in the nucleus to the ribosome sites of protein synthesis in the cell
ribonucleic acid, RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
Translations
ARN messager
References in periodicals archive ?
Patisiran is designed to silence specific messenger RNA, potentially blocking the production of TTR protein, which may help to enable the clearance of TTR amyloid deposits in peripheral tissues and potentially restore function to these tissues.
The cells produce the shortened form of the protein by recognizing and using a specific series of nucleotides in the messenger RNA that encodes the instructions to make the PDGFR alpha protein.
Messenger RNA is a molecule that carries specific genetic codes to parts of the cell.
Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a molecular cousin of DNA that carries information from the genetic code to protein-making machinery in cells.
United States-based Merck has signed a license and three-year research collaboration with Moderna Therapeutics, a biotechnology company that is researching and developing protein therapies based on novel messenger RNA technology, it was reported on Thursday.
The researchers, from Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and collaborators at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital, inserted modified strands of messenger RNA into connective tissue stem cells--called mesenchymal stem cells--which stimulated the cells to produce adhesive surface proteins and secrete interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory molecule.
Two other types of RNA, transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA, help read messenger RNA during protein creation, leaving many scientists to assume RNA's only job was as a low-level employee on the protein production line.
This particular riboswitch resides in the messenger RNA that carries instructions for the enzyme responsible for the production of glucosamine-6-phosphate, called GlmS.
The research, which focuses on the odd chemical "cap" of messenger RNA, is described in the September 24 issue of Molecular Cell.
The long-term clinical effects of soy protein containing various amounts of isoflavones on lipoproteins, mononuclear cell LDL receptor messenger RNA concentrations, and other selected cardiovascular risk factors are not well known.
The information contained in the DNA molecules gets transcribed into a message in another molecule called the messenger RNA.
Well, now there is a new twist to that understanding, which is redefining the approach to disease treatment: DNA makes messenger RNA and messenger RNA induces RNA interference (RNAi), a natural cellular mechanism that takes place in all organisms--plant and animal--and that blocks protein synthesis by "switching off" or silencing genes.