meta-


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meta-

(word root) changed
Examples of words with the root meta-: metamorphosis
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

meta-

or met-
pref.
1.
a. Later in time: metestrus.
b. At a later stage of development: metanephros.
2. Situated behind: metacarpus.
3.
a. Change; transformation: metachromatism.
b. Alternation: metagenesis.
4.
a. More comprehensive: meta-analysis.
b. Describing or showing an awareness of the activity that is taking place or being discussed; self-referential: metafiction.
c. At a higher state of development: metazoan.
5. Having undergone metamorphosis: metasomatic.
6. Chemistry
a. Derived from, as an acid, by dehydration: metaphosphoric acid.
b. Of or relating to one of three possible isomers of a benzene ring with two attached chemical groups, in which the carbon atoms with attached groups are separated by one unsubstituted carbon atom: meta-dibromobenzene.

[Greek, from meta, beside, after; see me- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

meta-

or sometimes before a vowel

met-

prefix
1. indicating change, alteration, or alternation: metabolism; metamorphosis.
2. (Education) (of an academic discipline, esp philosophy) concerned with the concepts and results of the named discipline: metamathematics; meta-ethics. See also metatheory
3. occurring or situated behind or after: metaphase.
4. (Elements & Compounds) (often in italics) denoting that an organic compound contains a benzene ring with substituents in the 1,3-positions: metadinitrobenzene; meta-cresol. Abbreviation: m- Compare ortho-4, para-16
5. (Elements & Compounds) denoting an isomer, polymer, or compound related to a specified compound (often differing from similar compounds that are prefixed by para-): metaldehyde.
6. (Elements & Compounds) denoting an oxyacid that is a lower hydrated form of the anhydride or a salt of such an acid: metaphosphoric acid. Compare ortho-5
[Greek, from meta with, after, between, among. Compare Old English mid, mith with, Old Norse meth with, between]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a

(ˈmɛt ə)

adj.
pertaining to or occupying positions (1, 3) in the benzene ring separated by one carbon atom. Compare ortho, para2.
[1875–80; independent use of meta-]

meta-

1. a prefix appearing in loanwords from Greek, with the meanings “after,” “along with,” “beyond,” “among,” “behind,” and productive in English on the Greek model: metacarpus; metalinguistics.
2.
a. a combining form used in the names of acids, salts, or their organic derivatives that are the least hydrated of a given series: meta-antimonic HSbO3. Compare ortho- (def. 2a), pyro- (def. 2a).
b. a combining form used in the names of benzene derivatives in which the substituting group occupies the meta position in the benzene ring. Abbr.: m-
Also, esp. before a vowel, met-.
[< Greek, prefix and preposition]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

meta-

prefmeta-, Meta-
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Below I will go trough a few of the Swedish idiomatic compounds and then take up a number of word-formations with meta- in order to try to clarify whether you could call these formations compounds or not, and whether their semantics justify a classification as idioms.
What prompted my interest in the use of meta- as a prefix was the manuscript on metaphilosophy that I had been asked to review.
Comprehensive research reviews in education have been limited to the use of aggregated data (AD) meta- analysis, techniques based on quantitatively combining information from studies on the same topic.