commensalism

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Related to metabiosis: commensals

com·men·sal·ism

 (kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal·ism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives benefit without harming the other. See Note at symbiosis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

commensalism

a relationship between animals or plants in which one lives with or on the other without damage to either. Cf. parasitism.
See also: Animals
the living together of two organisms in a relationship that is beneficial to one and has no effect on the other. — commensal, adj.
See also: Biology
the practice of eating together at the same table. Also commensality. — commensal, n., adj.
See also: Food and Nutrition
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commensalism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms when one receives benefits from the other without damaging it
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The direct effects on biogeochemical cycling occur through fragmentation, a process known as metabiosis, and by the incorporation of plant debris into the soil, resulting in the creation of new microhabitats, increasing the number of ecological niches and also leading to a complex food chain, allowing the colonization of new species of microorganisms, fauna and even vegetables, thus increasing biodiversity (Correia and Oliveira, 2005).
[31] Ikram-ul-Haq, Protein enrichment of rice polishing through metabiosis and its biological evaluation [Ph.D.
[C.sup.p.sub.c] is a competition and/or metabiosis factor for the ith microbe which accounts for interactions among two or more microbial species when they: 1) cooperate or depend on each other to use the same substrate (metabiosis); or 2) compete for the same 'food' and space (competition).