metacognition

(redirected from metacognitions)
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metacognition

(ˌmɛtəkɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
(Psychology) psychol thinking about one's own mental processes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
métacognition
References in periodicals archive ?
Metacognitions that are not specific to any psychiatric disorder can be called "generic metacognitions." Generic metacognitions are general metacognitions that can be seen both in OCD and in other psychiatric disorders.
studied these relationships, using the Metacognition Questionnaire-30 scale to evaluate generic metacognitions and the Maudsley Obsessional Compulsive Inventory to evaluate the dimensions of O-C symptoms.
The findings regarding the first objective of the study indicate that the most commonly used learning habits by medical students were metacognitions and self-regulation (80.5%; Table 3).
Specifically, motivation, test-taking anxiety, and metacognitions are demonstrated as significant predictors of academic performance (Table 5).
To assess the metacognitions of married adults in Bahawalpur District.
The translated version of Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (Wells and Cart- Wright Hatton 2004) was used as an instrument for data collection.
CIP theory includes four main career choice components: knowledge about self, knowledge about options, decision making, and metacognitions (how one thinks about one's decision making).
One means of exploring this aspect of math cognition is through an investigation of individual differences in metacognition.
Loosely defined, metacognition is often referred to as "thinking about thinking." The abstract nature of metacognition leads to difficulty in developing one all-encompassing, yet meaningful definition that lends itself to empirical investigation (e.g., Schoenfeld, 1992).
The authors present five key elements that reinforce the development of purpose, including identity, self-efficacy, metacognition, culture, and service.
Our purpose-centered approach to career development focuses on five key elements that reinforce the development of purpose: identity, self-efficacy, metacognition, culture, and service.
The participants were assessed with the Lucidity and Consciousness in Dreams Scale (LuCiD), the Metacognition Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), and the Van Dream Anxiety Scale (VDAS).