metalanguage


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met·a·lan·guage

 (mĕt′ə-lăng′gwĭj)
n.
1. A language or vocabulary used to describe or analyze language.
2. Computers A language used to define another language.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metalanguage

(ˈmɛtəˌlæŋɡwɪdʒ)
n
(Linguistics) a language or system of symbols used to discuss another language or system. See also formal language, natural language Compare object language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a•lan•guage

(ˈmɛt əˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ)

n.
a language or symbolic system used to discuss, describe, or analyze another language or symbolic system.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languagesmetalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languages
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
syntax language - a language used to describe the syntax of another language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
metajazyk
metakieli
hjálparmállýsimál
メタ言語
metajazyk

metalanguage

[ˈmetəˌlæŋgwɪdʒ] Nmetalenguaje m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

metalanguage

nMetasprache f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
This metalanguage is introduced so students are able to discuss the design features and meanings of visual text.
If the language under discussion (the object language) is L, then the definition should be given in another language known as the metalanguage, call it M.
or dig deeper and investigate the scientific metalanguage used
There is another objection, based on the same type of example, that is not susceptible to Sagi's criticism: accepting the examples as logical terms would have the fatal consequence that any contingent metalanguage sentence is entailed by the truth of some logically true object-language sentence.
'The teaching and learning cycle supports students through use of a shared metalanguage towards control of a particular genre or knowledge goal.
Exploring the risk of failure that she sees at the heart of 20th-century writing, Grossman discusses the issue in chapters entitled out of oneself; the voices of Jacques Derrida; Emmanuel Levinas' seed of folly; "There is no such thing as metalanguage:" Lacan and Beckett; what an archive is: Beckett and Foucault; at the limit: a reading of Samuel Beckett's That Time; Blanchot hero; and Blanchot's anagrams: a reading of Thomas the Obscure.
More recent research has highlighted the importance of developing a metalanguage that students may use to more explicitly discuss how images are constructed, as well as understanding how multiple modes of meaning, including the written, spoken and visual, work in unison (Callow, 2008; Pantaleo, 2015b; Unsworth, 2006).
This implies that a metareligion is a comprehensive metalanguage of religious languages.
In Chapter 5, Ricci continues to portray, fully and systematically, the role of the "micronarratives" contained in all artifacts, while revealing the extensive role of the "non-discrete metalanguage of distinctive sociocultural features." (205).
CADY NOLAND, "TOWARDS A METALANGUAGE OF EVIL" (1989) First published in the journal BALCON, this text explores with chilling clarity the strategies of the psychopath (or the "entrepreneurial male"), the logic of capitalism, and the brutality of the media.
We have previously written extensively about the need to teach students a metalanguage that enables them to engage in critical literacy practices with multimodal texts, that is, to engage in visual literacy (Anstey & Bull, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2012; Bull & Anstey, 2010a, 2010b, 2013; Department of Education, WA, 2013).