metamorphosis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

 (mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. met·a·mor·pho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

[Latin metamorphōsis, from Greek, from metamorphoun, to transform : meta-, meta- + morphē, form.]

metamorphosis

(ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. a complete change of physical form or substance
2. a complete change of character, appearance, etc
3. a person or thing that has undergone metamorphosis
4. (Zoology) zoology the rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in certain animals, for example the stage between tadpole and frog or between chrysalis and butterfly
[C16: via Latin from Greek: transformation, from meta- + morphē form]

met•a•mor•pho•sis

(ˌmɛt əˈmɔr fə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. a profound change in form from stage to the next in the life history of an organism, as from the pupa to the adult butterfly.
2. a complete change of form, structure, or substance, as transformation by magic.
3. any complete change in appearance, character, circumstances, etc.
4.
a. a type of alteration or degeneration in which tissues are changed.
b. the resultant form.
[1525–35; < New Latin < Greek metamórphōsis transformation. See meta-, -morph, -osis]
click for a larger image
metamorphosis
development of a monarch butterfly from egg to larva (caterpillar) to pupa (cocoon) to imago (adult)

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
Dramatic change in the form and often the habits of an animal during its development after birth or hatching. The transformation of a maggot into an adult fly, and of a tadpole into an adult frog, are examples of metamorphosis. The young of such animals are called larvae.

metamorphosis

1. change in form, structure, appearance, etc.
2. magical transformation. — metamorphic, metamorphous, adj.
See also: Change, Magic
a change or succession of changes in form during the life cycle of an animal, allowing it to adapt to different environmental conditions, as a caterpillar into a butterfly.
See also: Zoology

metamorphosis

Change in the form of certain organisms between the juvenile and adult stages, e.g. tadpole and frog.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animalsmetamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animals
hemimetabolism, hemimetaboly, hemimetamorphosis - incomplete or partial metamorphosis in insects
heterometabolism, heterometaboly - development of insects with incomplete metamorphosis in which no pupal stage precedes maturity
holometabolism, holometaboly - complete metamorphosis in insects
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.metamorphosis - a striking change in appearance or character or circumstances; "the metamorphosis of the old house into something new and exciting"
revision, alteration - the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification); "it would require a drastic revision of his opinion"
3.metamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraftmetamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraft
translation, transformation - the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"

metamorphosis

metamorphosis

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
تَحَوُّل، مَسْخ
proměna
forvandling
muodonmuutos
metamorfoza
metamorfózis
umbreyting; hamskipti
metamorfozė
metamorfoze
başkalaşımmetamorfoz

metamorphosis

[ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsɪs] N (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosis f inv

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsɪs] [metamorphoses] [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsiːs] (pl) nmétamorphose f

metamorphosis

n pl <metamorphoses> → Metamorphose f; (fig)Verwandlung f

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs] n (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosi f inv

metamorphosis

(metəˈmoːfəsis) plural ˌmetaˈmorphoses (-siːz) noun
(a) marked change of form, appearance, character etc. a caterpillar's metamorphosis into a butterfly.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

n. metamorfosis.
1. cambio de forma o estructura;
2. cambio degenerativo patológico.
References in classic literature ?
But in the loneliest wilderness happeneth the second metamorphosis: here the spirit becometh a lion; freedom will it capture, and lordship in its own wilderness.
For through that better perception he stands one step nearer to things, and sees the flowing or metamorphosis; perceives that thought is multiform; that within the form of every creature is a force impelling it to ascend into a higher form; and following with his eyes the life, uses the forms which express that life, and so his speech flows with the flowing of nature.
In the second stage, answering to the chrysalis stage of butterflies, they have six pairs of beautifully constructed natatory legs, a pair of magnificent compound eyes, and extremely complex antennae; but they have a closed and imperfect mouth, and cannot feed: their function at this stage is, to search by their well-developed organs of sense, and to reach by their active powers of swimming, a proper place on which to become attached and to undergo their final metamorphosis. When this is completed they are fixed for life: their legs are now converted into prehensile organs; they again obtain a well-constructed mouth; but they have no antennae, and their two eyes are now reconverted into a minute, single, and very simple eye-spot.
The transition had been so sudden and so unexpected that it left me for a moment forgetful of aught else than my strange metamorphosis. My first thought was, is this then death!
His next care on leaving the barber's who had achieved his first metamorphosis was to enter a shop and buy a complete sailor's suit -- a garb, as we all know, very simple, and consisting of white trousers, a striped shirt, and a cap.
A few hours in a populous town, however, produced a magical metamorphosis. Hats of the most ample brim and longest nap; coats with buttons that shone like mirrors, and pantaloons of the most ample plenitude, took place of the well-worn trapper's equipments; and the happy wearers might be seen strolling about in all directions, scattering their silver like sailors just from a cruise.
The bidet purchased at Chateaubriand completed the metamorphosis; it was called, or rather D'Artagnan called it, Furet (ferret).
It was the shoes that caused the metamorphosis by means of which, unknown to himself, he took upon him the thoughts and feelings of the officer; but, as we have just seen, he felt himself in his new situation much less contented, and now preferred the very thing which but some minutes before he had rejected.
But while opinion concerning him had remained nearly stationary, and his daily habits had presented scarcely any visible change, Marner's inward life had been a history and a metamorphosis, as that of every fervid nature must be when it has fled, or been condemned, to solitude.
"You were engaged with a couple of wine-skins, and not a giant," said the landlord at this; but Don Fernando told him to hold his tongue and on no account interrupt Don Quixote, who continued, "I say in conclusion, high and disinherited lady, that if your father has brought about this metamorphosis in your person for the reason I have mentioned, you ought not to attach any importance to it; for there is no peril on earth through which my sword will not force a way, and with it, before many days are over, I will bring your enemy's head to the ground and place on yours the crown of your kingdom."
Remorse for a scurvy act, and an honorable desire to right the wrong he had done the woman he now knew he really loved had excited these germs to rapid growth in Morison Baynes--and the metamorphosis had taken place.
Woola did not approve of the metamorphosis. He sniffed at me and growled ominously, but when I spoke to him and patted his huge head he at length became reconciled to the change, and at my command trotted off along the corridor in the direction we had been going when our progress had been interrupted by the therns.