metaphoric


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met·a·phor

 (mĕt′ə-fôr′, -fər)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world's a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven" (Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk), met′a·phor′i·cal adj.
met′a·phor′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.metaphoric - expressing one thing in terms normally denoting anothermetaphoric - expressing one thing in terms normally denoting another; "a metaphorical expression"; "metaphoric language"
figurative, nonliteral - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إسْتِعاري، مَجازي
metaforikus

metaphoric

[ˌmɛtəˈfɒrɪk] metaphorical [ˌmɛtəˈfɒrɪkl] adjmetaforico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

metaphor

(ˈmetəfə) noun
a form of expression (not using `like' or `as')in which a quality or characteristic is given to a person or thing by using a name, image, adjective etc normally used of something else which has similar qualities etc. `He's a tiger when he's angry' is an example of (a) metaphor.
ˌmetaˈphoric(al) (-ˈfo-) adjective
of, like or using metaphors. metaphorical language.
ˌmetaˈphorically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
LAHORE -- Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) leader Aleem Khan said NAB should catch big fish rather than frogs, a metaphoric term he used for the people involved in huge corruption scandals.
The purpose of this exploratory study is to scrutinize how CEOs communicate with their stakeholders via metaphoric language using micro-blogs and extend previous research on this topic in the literature.
Flieger explains in Splintered Light that Barfield's "theory of the ancient semantic unity" (39) of literal and metaphoric uses of words, of the "interdependence of myth and language" (xxi), was an immense influence on Tolkien's thoughts about the evolution of language and underpin the development of both language and racial history in his legendarium.
The end of humanity may be closer than expected: scientists announced the metaphoric time of the end of the world Thursday morning, setting the clock at 11:57:30 p.m.
In this book, author Sylvia Weber Russell presents readers with a comprehensive guide to employing a computational method for the interpretation of conventional and unconventional metaphorical phrases, using connotations and a readerAEs semantic knowledge of the metaphoric words employed.
According to analysts, Siddiqui's metaphoric statement alludes that MQM's protest movement that launches on/from Sunday is not going to end anytime soon.
To frame a selective overview of some of the major thinking on metaphor in general use, I've provided a brief discussion of three examples of metaphoric uses: two of them in general use and one in poetry.
A high schooler in Wales is pursued by the spirit of her dead identical twin in Isabel Coixet's ludicrous bid for the teen-girl crowd, "Another Me." Stunningly unsuccessful on all levels, this gothic dud wants to play on the real and metaphoric anxieties of post-adolescents discovering who they are, but the hamfisted script is incapable of a multilayered approach, while the helming and editing are at the level of mediocre TV.
An exhibition titled 'Metaphoric' by Iraqi-born British artist Sabah Arbili was held at the Cultural Village Katara.
This collection of sixteen chapter-length essays explores the value of metaphoric process and fields for psychoanalysis.
They say "In this present time of glaring, intrusive, nasty media, it is hard to imagine the proportions of the Queen's achievement in serving 60 years, every one of them as the most prominent and publicised people in the world without one gaffe, one injudicious utterance or slip on a banana peel, literal or metaphoric" - Lord (Conrad) Black pays his tribute from his Florida prison cell.
In pioneering earlier studies like The Dynamics of the Metaphoric Field: A Cognitive View of Literature, 1992, and Baudelaire: At the Limits and Beyond, 1997, Babuts has analyzed the way literary texts reveal the crucial role played by an individual writer's mnemonic processes as they intervene to transform the world of lived experience into freshly conceived metaphoric patterns.