metaphrase


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met·a·phrase

 (mĕt′ə-frāz′)
n.
A word-for-word translation.
tr.v. met·a·phrased, met·a·phras·ing, met·a·phras·es
1. To translate, especially literally.
2. To manipulate the wording of (a text), especially as a means of subtly altering the sense.

[New Latin metaphrasis, from Greek, translation, paraphrase, from metaphrazein, to translate : meta-, meta- + phrazein, to tell, show; see gwhren- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phras′tic (-frăs′tĭk) adj.

metaphrase

(ˈmɛtəˌfreɪz)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) : metaphrasis a literal translation. Compare paraphrase
vb (tr)
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to alter or manipulate the wording of
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to translate literally
[C17: from Greek metaphrazein to translate]

metaphrasis, metaphrase

the practice of making a literal translation from one language into another. Cf. paraphrasis. — metaphrast, n. — metaphrastic, metaphrastical, adj.
See also: Language

metaphrase


Past participle: metaphrased
Gerund: metaphrasing

Imperative
metaphrase
metaphrase
Present
I metaphrase
you metaphrase
he/she/it metaphrases
we metaphrase
you metaphrase
they metaphrase
Preterite
I metaphrased
you metaphrased
he/she/it metaphrased
we metaphrased
you metaphrased
they metaphrased
Present Continuous
I am metaphrasing
you are metaphrasing
he/she/it is metaphrasing
we are metaphrasing
you are metaphrasing
they are metaphrasing
Present Perfect
I have metaphrased
you have metaphrased
he/she/it has metaphrased
we have metaphrased
you have metaphrased
they have metaphrased
Past Continuous
I was metaphrasing
you were metaphrasing
he/she/it was metaphrasing
we were metaphrasing
you were metaphrasing
they were metaphrasing
Past Perfect
I had metaphrased
you had metaphrased
he/she/it had metaphrased
we had metaphrased
you had metaphrased
they had metaphrased
Future
I will metaphrase
you will metaphrase
he/she/it will metaphrase
we will metaphrase
you will metaphrase
they will metaphrase
Future Perfect
I will have metaphrased
you will have metaphrased
he/she/it will have metaphrased
we will have metaphrased
you will have metaphrased
they will have metaphrased
Future Continuous
I will be metaphrasing
you will be metaphrasing
he/she/it will be metaphrasing
we will be metaphrasing
you will be metaphrasing
they will be metaphrasing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been metaphrasing
you have been metaphrasing
he/she/it has been metaphrasing
we have been metaphrasing
you have been metaphrasing
they have been metaphrasing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been metaphrasing
you will have been metaphrasing
he/she/it will have been metaphrasing
we will have been metaphrasing
you will have been metaphrasing
they will have been metaphrasing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been metaphrasing
you had been metaphrasing
he/she/it had been metaphrasing
we had been metaphrasing
you had been metaphrasing
they had been metaphrasing
Conditional
I would metaphrase
you would metaphrase
he/she/it would metaphrase
we would metaphrase
you would metaphrase
they would metaphrase
Past Conditional
I would have metaphrased
you would have metaphrased
he/she/it would have metaphrased
we would have metaphrased
you would have metaphrased
they would have metaphrased
References in periodicals archive ?
First is "metaphrase" in which the translator uses a literal or word-for-word method.
In "Unlocking the Word-hoard: In Praise of Metaphrase," Charles Martindale compares three versions of the ode--Cowley's, Fanshawe's, and Milton's--and argues that each translation embodies one of Dryden's categories--imitation, paraphrase, and metaphrase, respectively.
(85.) Metaphrase is the word-for-word, line-for-line rendering of a text, as contrasted with paraphrase.
1) Metaphrase: literal, word-for-word--this was pure slavery, being too strict, too "straight."
First, that of Metaphrase, or turning an Authour word by word, and Line by Line, from Language into another....
John Dryden, with his pioneering taxonomy of translation methods ('metaphrase', 'paraphrase' and 'imitation'), stands out among other translators such as Denham and Cowley.
LOUKIA STEPHOU: DIE NEUGRIECHISCHE METAPHRASE VON STEPHANITES UND ICHNELATES DURCH THEODOSIOS ZYGOMALAS.
In the preface he refers to the scheme by which John Dryden classified translations according to degree of literal faithfulness: the categories of metaphrase (word-for-word translation), paraphrase (looser translation), and imitation.
Translations, because in spite of the short chapter on 'Theories of Translation' , with its obligatory reference to Dryden' s distinction between metaphrase, paraphrase, and imitation (p.
The table of brass is inscribed with an idiosyncratic metaphrase of the beginning of Virgil's epic, suitably adapted to the tentative Chaucerian style: "I wol now synge, yif I kan/ The armes and also the man" (143).
A similar play of thematic fragments is at work in LeMoyen de parvenir where the 111 chapter titles, drawn from the patrimony of knowledge or from encyclopedic models (for example, "Metaphrase," "Theoreme," "Concile," "Parlement," "Contract," etc.), can be freely transposed like the fragmentation and variation in emblematic writing.
All Translation I suppose may be reduced to these three heads: First, that of Metaphrase, or turning an author word by word, and Line by Line, from one Language into another .