metaphysics

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met·a·phys·ics

(mĕt′ə-fĭz′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) Philosophy The branch of philosophy that examines the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, possibility and actuality.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The theoretical or first principles of a particular discipline: the metaphysics of law.
3. (used with a sing. verb) A priori speculation upon questions that are unanswerable to scientific observation, analysis, or experiment.
4. (used with a sing. verb) Excessively subtle or recondite reasoning.

[From pl. of Middle English methaphisik, from Medieval Latin metaphysica, from Medieval Greek (ta) metaphusika, from Greek (Ta) meta (ta) phusika, (the works) after the Physics, the title of Aristotle's treatise on first principles (so called because it followed his work on physics) : meta, after; see meta- + phusika, physics; see physics.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metaphysics

(ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Philosophy) the branch of philosophy that deals with first principles, esp of being and knowing
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical study of the nature of reality, concerned with such questions as the existence of God, the external world, etc
3. (Philosophy) See descriptive metaphysics
4. (popularly) abstract or subtle discussion or reasoning
[C16: from Medieval Latin, from Greek ta meta ta phusika the things after the physics, from the arrangement of the subjects treated in the works of Aristotle]
metaphysician, metaphysicist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a•phys•ics

(ˌmɛt əˈfɪz ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, includes ontology and cosmology, and is intimately connected with epistemology.
2. philosophy, esp. in its more abstruse branches.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphysics

a branch of philosophy concerned with being, first principles, and often including aspects of cosmology and epistemology. — metaphysician, n.metaphysical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphysics

A branch of philosophy dealing with questions of being.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowingmetaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowing
hypostasis - (metaphysics) essential nature or underlying reality
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
ontology - the metaphysical study of the nature of being and existence
cosmology - the metaphysical study of the origin and nature of the universe
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

metaphysics

[ˌmetəˈfɪzɪks] NSINGmetafísica f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nmétaphysique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

metaphysics

n singMetaphysik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nsgmetafisica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
of Notre Dame) and metaphysicist and applied ethicist Tooley (U.
Kant, the physics teacher turned metaphysicist, said "Nature does nothing in vain, and in the use of means to her goal she is not prodigal."(6) Thomas Paine said in the opening to Common Sense, "I draw my idea of the form of government from a principle in nature which no art can overturn, viz.
Thereby Hegel, as a philosopher of nature, was positioned somewhere between the classical Aristotelian 'researcher' of nature (observer) and the classical Aristotelian 'metaphysicist' (speculator).