metempsychosis

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me·tem·psy·cho·sis

 (mə-tĕm′sĭ-kō′sĭs, mĕt′əm-sī-)
n. pl. me·tem·psy·cho·ses (-sēz)
Reincarnation.

[Late Latin metempsȳchōsis, from Greek metempsūkhōsis, from metempsūkhousthai, to transmigrate : meta-, meta- + empsūkhos, animate (en, in; see en-2 + psūkhē, soul; see bhes- in Indo-European roots).]

metempsychosis

(ˌmɛtəmsaɪˈkəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Theology) the migration of a soul from one body to another
2. (Theology) the entering of a soul after death upon a new cycle of existence in a new body either of human or animal form
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek, from metempsukhousthai, from meta- + -em- in + psukhē soul]
ˌmetempsyˈchosist n

me•tem•psy•cho•sis

(məˌtɛm səˈkoʊ sɪs, -ˌtɛmp-, ˌmɛt əm saɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
the transmigration of the soul, esp. the passage of the soul after death into the body of another being.
[1580–90; < Late Latin < Greek, =metempsȳchō-, variant s. of metempsȳchoûsthai to pass from one body into another (see met-, em-2, psycho-) + -sis -sis]
met•em•psy•chic (ˌmɛt əmˈsaɪ kɪk) me•tem`psy•cho′sic adj.

metempsychosis

1. the passage of a soul from one body to another.
2. the rebirth of the soul at death in another body, either human or animal. Cf. creationism. — metempsychic, metempsychosic, metempsychosical, adj.
See also: Soul
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metempsychosis - after death the soul begins a new cycle of existence in another human bodymetempsychosis - after death the soul begins a new cycle of existence in another human body
phenomenon - any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning
Translations
Metempsychose
sielunvaellus
метемпсихоза

metempsychosis

[ˌmetəmsaɪˈkəʊsɪs] Nmetempsicosis f inv

metempsychosis

n pl <metempsychoses> → Metempsychose f
References in periodicals archive ?
However, by 1846, in true "metempsychotic" fashion, Hawthorne recollected his former self and included the tale in Mosses.
His provocative revisionist reading of Cixous, whom Harris positions as a theorist of tactile, metonymic, and conjunctive difference, pairs well with his judicious take on Cavendish's equally permissive metempsychotic metaphysics: for me, this chapter was one of the high points of an appealing, smart, and useful book.
(18) The Baron regards 'the furious animal' as 'the very counterpart' of 'the mysterious steed' portrayed in his tapestry, but he does not, at a conscious level at least, recognize the metempsychotic change in the horse (16).
Also essential to Glosecki's concept of shamanism are ecstasy, a trancelike state in which the shaman enters another reality and time (Eliade's illo tempore) (8) and engages in a metempsychotic journey; therapy, where the shaman can engage in both healing or the inflicting of disease; and assistance, the presence of animal guardians (Shamanism 7-8).
Under Hugo's pen, the exceptional quality of Paris is to he found in its metempsychotic absorption of history's great cities:
(One should point out that the caption to the building shown on page 199 should be the Radcliffe Camera not the Radcliffe Observatory.) He is not so sure-footed when it comes to theology and history: the Host does not become the Body of Christ 'a moment or two before ingestion' but at the Consecration; references to 'a little splinter of Peter in every Pope' and 'metempsychotic or even shamanic transference' presumably refer to apostolic succession; and Mussolini was not Emanuel III's 'head of state', an office retained by the overwhelmed King.
The surface-memory here involves a chance encounter with a woman at an inn--"not" a sexual encounter, but a metempsychotic encounter that is both staggering and oddly staggered.
Given this character's spatial and temporal diffusion, his boundless and factually inconceivable presence, the two slight italicized sections jostle the novel from the psychotic--the epistemological ambiguities of metamorphosis--to the metempsychotic. On the Canadian beach Elle wonders of the folk-narrative that preoccupies her, "did the story simply inhabit the place like a ghost, letting itself nestle in the minds of receptive hosts as they came by?" (204).