meteor


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Related to meteor: meteorite

meteor

a fiery streak in the sky produced by a meteoroid passing through the earth’s atmosphere; a shooting star; something or someone that moves with spectacular speed: a meteoric rise in popularity
Not to be confused with:
meatier – having more meat; more thought-provoking: a meatier subject

me·te·or

 (mē′tē-ər, -ôr′)
n.
1. A bright streak of light that appears in the sky when a meteoroid is heated to incandescence by friction with the earth's atmosphere. Also called falling star, meteor burst, shooting star.
2. A meteoroid or meteorite.
3. Archaic Any atmospheric phenomenon, such as a rainbow, lightning, or snow.

[Middle English metheour, atmospheric phenomenon, from Old French meteore, from Medieval Latin meteōrum, from Greek meteōron, astronomical phenomenon, from neuter of meteōros, high in the air : meta-, meta- + -āoros, lifted; akin to āeirein, to lift up; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

meteor

(ˈmiːtɪə)
n
1. (Astronomy) a very small meteoroid that has entered the earth's atmosphere. Such objects have speeds approaching 70 kilometres per second
2. (Astronomy) Also called: shooting star or falling star the bright streak of light appearing in the sky due to the incandescence of such a body heated by friction at its surface
[C15: from Medieval Latin meteōrum, from Greek meteōron something aloft, from meteōros lofty, from meta- (intensifier) + aeirein to raise]

me•te•or

(ˈmi ti ər, -ˌɔr)

n.
1.
a. a meteoroid that has entered the earth's atmosphere.
b. a transient fiery streak in the sky produced by a meteoroid passing through the earth's atmosphere; a shooting star or bolide.
2. any atmospheric phenomenon, as hail or a typhoon.
[1470–80; (< Medieval Latin meteōrum) < Greek metḗoron n. use of neuter of metḗoros in midair (compare tà metéōra celestial phenomena) =met- met- + -ēoros, adj. derivative of aéirein to raise]
me′te•or•like`, adj.

meteor.

1. meteorological.
2. meteorology.

me·te·or

(mē′tē-ər)
1. A bright trail or streak of light that appears in the night sky when a meteoroid enters the Earth's atmosphere. The friction with the air causes the rock to glow with heat.
2. A rocky body that produces such light. Most meteors burn up before reaching the Earth's surface. ♦ A meteor shower occurs when a large number of meteors appear together and seem to come from the same area in the sky. See Note at solar system.
Usage The streaks of light we sometimes see in the night sky and call meteors were not identified as interplanetary rocks until the 19th century. Before then, the streaks of light were considered only one of a variety of atmospheric phenomena, all of which bore the name meteor. Rain was an aqueous meteor, winds and storms were airy meteors, and streaks of light in the sky were fiery meteors. This general use of meteor survives in our word meteorology, the study of the weather and atmospheric phenomena. Nowadays, astronomers use any of three words for rocks from interplanetary space, depending on their stage of descent to the Earth. A meteoroid is a rock in space that has the potential to collide with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteoroids range in size from a speck of dust to a chunk about 100 meters in diameter, though most are smaller than a pebble. Thus if a small or tiny asteroid or fragment of a comet is floating in orbit near the Earth, it is called a meteoroid. When a meteoroid enters the atmosphere, it becomes a meteor. The light that it gives off when heated by friction with the atmosphere is also called a meteor. If the rock is not obliterated by the friction and lands on the ground, it is called a meteorite. For this term, scientists borrowed the -ite suffix used in the names of minerals like malachite and pyrite.

meteor

  • astrobleme - A crater caused by a meteor.
  • aerolithology - The study of meteors.
  • meteorite - A meteor that survives and makes it to a planet; types of meteorites include siderites/irons, aerolites/stones, and siderolites (iron/stone).
  • falling star - Another name for meteor or shooting star.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meteor - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmospheremeteor - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmosphere
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
meteorite - stony or metallic object that is the remains of a meteoroid that has reached the earth's surface
meteor swarm - a group of meteoroids with similar paths
2.meteor - a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth's atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explodemeteor - a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth's atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explode
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
bolide, fireball - an especially luminous meteor (sometimes exploding)
meteor shower, meteor stream - a transient shower of meteors when a meteor swarm enters the earth's atmosphere

meteor

noun
Related words
fear meteorophobia

meteor

noun falling star, comet, meteorite, fireball, shooting star, bolide It takes place in the future after a meteor has landed.
Translations
نَيْزَك، شِهاب
meteor
meteor
meteoritähdenlento
hullócsillagmeteor
stjörnuhrap, loftsteinn
meteorasmeteoritasstaigus ir trumpas
meteors
meteor

meteor

[ˈmiːtɪəʳ]
A. Nmeteoro m
B. CPD meteor shower Nlluvia f de meteoritos

meteor

[ˈmiːtiər] nmétéore m

meteor

nMeteor m

meteor

[ˈmiːtɪəʳ] nmeteora

meteor

(ˈmiːtiə) noun
(also shooting star) a small mass or body travelling very quickly through space which appears very bright after entering the earth's atmosphere.
ˌmeteˈoric (-ˈo-) adjective
(of success etc) rapid and often only lasting for a short time. a meteoric rise to fame.
ˈmeteorite (-rait) noun
a small meteor that has fallen to earth.
References in classic literature ?
Consequently I affirm that, if our projectile had struck the meteor, its speed thus suddenly checked would have raised a heat great enough to turn it into vapor instantaneously."
"They have even calculated," continued the imperturbable Barbicane, "that the shock of each meteor on the sun ought to produce a heat equal to that of 4,000 masses of coal of an equal bulk."
Why cannot we walk outside like the meteor? Why cannot we launch into space through the scuttle?
Not but the meteor may have shown itself at that point, burning duskily through a veil of cloud, but with no such shape as his guilty imagination gave it, or, at least, with so little definiteness, that another's guilt might have seen another symbol in it.
Certainly, if the meteor kindled up the sky, and disclosed the earth, with an awfulness that admonished Hester Prynne and the clergyman of the day of judgment, then might Roger Chillingworth have passed with them for the arch-fiend, standing there with a smile and scowl, to claim his own.
This immense canopy of fire was perceived at a distance of one hundred miles out at sea, and more than one ship's captain entered in his log the appearance of this gigantic meteor.
The nearer moon of Mars makes a complete revolution around the planet in a little over seven and one-half hours, so that she may be seen hurtling through the sky like some huge meteor two or three times each night, revealing all her phases during each transit of the heavens.
Meantime the nearest bridge had been illuminated, and from several rafts anchored in the river, meteor showers of rockets, Roman candles, bombs, serpents, and Catharine wheels were being discharged in wasteful profusion into the sky--a marvelous sight indeed to a person as little used to such spectacles as I was.
"Patience, monseigneur, for you do not know what Colbert is -- study him quickly; it is with this dark financier as it is with meteors, which the eye never sees completely before their disastrous invasion; when we feel them we are dead."
Last night cloud-shadows gloomed the path that winds to my abode, And the torches of the river-boats like angry meteors glowed.
By excluding men under thirty-five from the first office, and those under thirty from the second, it confines the electors to men of whom the people have had time to form a judgment, and with respect to whom they will not be liable to be deceived by those brilliant appearances of genius and patriotism, which, like transient meteors, sometimes mislead as well as dazzle.
He speaks of high towers wherein people watched "winds, rain, snow, hail and some of the fiery meteors also." To-day we have observatories.