metic


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Related to metic: metis, Metric conversion

metic

(ˈmɛtɪk)
n
(Historical Terms) (in ancient Greece) an alien having some rights of citizenship in the city in which he lives
[C19: from Greek metoikos, from meta- (indicating change) + -oikos dwelling]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

metic

Ancient Greece. a foreigner or a resident alien.
See also: Greece and Greeks
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metic - an alien who paid a fee to reside in an ancient Greek citymetic - an alien who paid a fee to reside in an ancient Greek city
alien, foreigner, noncitizen, outlander - a person who comes from a foreign country; someone who does not owe allegiance to your country
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
I mean that the father grows accustomed to descend to the level of his sons and to fear them, and the son is on a level with his father, he having no respect or reverence for either of his parents; and this is his freedom, and metic is equal with the citizen and the citizen with the metic, and the stranger is quite as good as either.
Slaves, metics, (3) and aliens are excluded from citizenship and public life ("koinonia"), as well as women and children, who belong to the private sphere ("oikia").
We're the underdogs, 100 percent (against Gilas Pilipinas), Metic told Filipino scribes late Tuesday after qualifying to the knockout stages.
The tournament takes its final rest day on Wednesday and Baldwin welcomes this to be able to fully prepare for the Lebanese, whom he described as "capable like everyone else in winning this championship." "He (Lebanese coach Vesilin Metic) wants you (media) to believe that they are the underdogs and all those things," Baldwin said.
Because of its best quality, the Loralai's almonds are used in cos- metic manufactur- ing.
Complaining that eisangelia used to be only for very serious offenses but is now used for absurd charges, Hyperides (4.3) uses the following example: "Diognides and Antidorus the metic are subject to an eisangelia prosecution on a charge of hiring out female pipers at a higher price than that fixed by law."
All root canals should be accessed cleaned and shaped to receive a her- metic filling of the entire root canal space.
Five results tables show the maximum, geometric mean, arith metic mean, 95% UCL, and 95% UCL of log transformed data.
As a metic (resident alien) who lacked the rights of citizenship, Zeno, like Diogenes, was an outsider.
That can be effi- ciently used for producing (generally non- reusable) products for many end use applications and markets, such as dispos- able sanitary products, hygienic and cos- metic products industrial and household wipes, surgical and gowns and masks, medical end use products, bedsheets, air and filters, roofing materials, automotive interior components, military camouflage, tents, combat gear and other work outfits, geo and landscaping, reinforced composites and laminates, and even semi-durable durable (reusable) apparel/garments.
In "The Promise and Peril of Metic Intimacy," Detloff argues that modern metics, like their ancient counterparts, occupy a tenuous and liminal position that vacillates between belonging and unbelonging, and through a reading of several novels and a film by Kureishi highlights the manner in which this modern-day author offers a vision of"the potential of a non-heteronormative future for the multiethnic metropolis" that is present-day London.