metonym


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Related to metonym: metonymy, synecdoche

met·o·nym

 (mĕt′ə-nĭm′)
n.
A word used in metonymy.

[Back-formation from metonymy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metonym

(ˈmɛtənɪm)
n
(Grammar) a word used in a metonymy. For example the bottle is a metonym for alcoholic drink
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•o•nym

(ˈmɛt ə nɪm)

n.
a word used in metonymy.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metonym - a word that denotes one thing but refers to a related thing; "Washington is a metonym for the United States government"; "plastic is a metonym for credit card"
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
métonyme
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, Oakland has become a metonym for black radical thought in other films this year, including Boots Riley's Sorry to Bother You and Blindspotting , each of which addresses issues of identity, gender, class, assimilation, resistance and cultural appropriation.
Indeed, Oakland has become a metonym for black radical thought in other films this year, including Boots Riley's "Sorry to Bother You" and "Blindspotting," each of which addresses issues of identity, gender, class, assimilation, resistance and cultural appropriation.
The more caustic, perhaps even "arched," side of the narrator's style soon follows the deified "postmark." In the first paragraph, "mind" metonymically re-names the letter writer while the antithetical "body" metonym displaces the written letter enclosed in an "envelope" (Woolf 1923, 92).
In short, Novick's life serves as a metonym for the contradictory Jewish Communist movement as a whole, as his own disillusionment, isolation, and political irrelevance reflected the broader decline of the movement's importance globally.
Beyond show biz, moreover, colorism requires a wider national conversation, given the ever-increasing drive for whiteness, mediated by whitening products and s that make whiteness a metonym for wealth, beauty, and success.
239), which discusses how it influences and is influenced by various outside sources, and highlights, perhaps inadvertendy, the danger of letting an idioculture serve as a metonym for phenomena that cross cultures and social strata.
Among their topics are the perception of motherhood and folklore expressions among the Jews of Afghanistan, like mother like daughter: mother-daughter relations in Babylonian Talmudic stories, the Jewish mother as metonym for community in postwar America, Rachel and Mary weep for their children in the age of the Zohar, depictions of childbirth in Rabbinic literature: the innovation of a Genizah Midrashic text, and mothers and ma'asim: maternal roles in medieval Hebrew tales.
In the course of time, the term "Wall Street" that symbolizes the strength and resilience become a metonym for the economic engine of the United States and the financial hub of world as a whole.
In the Korean case at hand, young citizens' shared concern about the economy helped to elect Lee, making him a metonym (in which a part evokes the whole) for their desired prosperity.
As the series progresses, Farocki shows the development of the tree as if it were a metonym for the deepening of the digital environment as a whole, from command-line interface to rendered world.
It is a metonym, "the visible aspect of that presence" (p.
In the sonnet, Sokolov notes that pain begins as a metonym for rewarding work, to end up becoming a reflection of the Lady's cruelty.