metonymic


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Related to metonymic: synecdoche, metonymy

me·ton·y·my

 (mə-tŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. me·ton·y·mies
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated, as in the use of Washington for the United States government or of the sword for military power.

[Late Latin metōnymia, from Greek metōnumiā : meta-, meta- + onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

met′o·nym′ic (mĕt′ə-nĭm′ĭk), met′o·nym′i·cal adj.
met′o·nym′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.metonymic - using the name of one thing for that of another with which it is closely associated; "to say `he spent the evening reading Shakespeare' is metonymic because it substitutes the author himself for the author's works"
figurative, nonliteral - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
They characterize metonymy as a cognitive process where: 1) a source content provides access to a target content within one cognitive domain; 2) there is a contingent relation between the source and the target content; 3) the source content is backgrounded, and the target content is foregrounded; and 4) depending on the conceptual distance between the source and the target and the salience of the source, the metonymic link between the source and the target may be weak or strong (2007: 242).
Presenting first comparative studies then case studies, they consider such topics as what the grammaticalization of "head" revels about the semantic structure of a language, head in some non-Bantu languages of the Oriental Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo, metonymic extensions of the body part "head" in mental and social domains, head idioms in Turkish: contrasts and correlations, and semantic extensions of tatini "her head" and tati "his head" in Deni (Arawa).
A variety of projects can be mounted in the "metonymic landscape" of the DDP, in which the structure allows the merging of social actions and mixtures of uses that would not be possible in traditional single-use-oriented structures in which an auditorium is an auditorium, a lobby a lobby, or a food court is just a food court.
Metonymy can be seen as a cognitive operation of conceptual elaboration based on the part-whole relationship that is triggered by the use of an expression (or metonymic vehicle) that is associated with a certain conceptual cluster (or metonymic source) within conceptual domain so that the activation of the source conceptual cluster opens up a mental space that is dynamically expanded or reduced so as to come as close as possible to fitting the conceptual gabarits provided by the co(n)text of use, in the course of which the mental space thus opened and elaborated also comes very close in terms of its contents to another conceptual cluster (or metonymic target) within the same conceptual domain that may be or is typically associated with another expression.
That a metonymic portrayal of dispossession has more of a chance of undoing an international indifference than the dispossession itself seems to elucidate an incredible amount, not just about the Israel/Palestine conflict, but about our society and ourselves more generally.
340 #2 and Learning from the Work of Others, where signs of human intervention are overwhelmed by the marks of institutions, the metonymic function of After Willis's abrasions became much less certain.
Barootes's essay on the decline of the power of language through the ages of Arda, this paper will use terms describing phases of language from Northrop Frye's The Great Code--metaphoric, metonymic, demotic, and ricorso--to examine the path of the Ring/evil/power/naming complex through its extended diminution as the Ring moves from mythic-level metaphor, through magic, to degradation and destruction--from Morgoth's Ring of all Arda, through Sauron's Ruling Ring, to Saruman's pale imitation of Sauron, and finally to Gollum's sad struggle for mere subsistence.
Although chapters in the text stand alone, they can be read in a metonymic relation as a part of a complete book.
A red bekisar is an ornamental bird that is a cross between the wild and domesticated fowl and stands in a metonymic relation to Lasi, who is prized for her exotic beauty among elite Indonesians.
(I understand that this statement is hyperbolic and technically incorrect--there is always some time--but the world increasingly downplays and lessens the amount of time and other mediators through which mediation can occur, thus constantly marching us closer to the ever-nearing, if never quite present, asymptotic horizon of pure immediacy.) Predatory capitalism--the metonymic equivalent of the fast zombie--desires just such a world of less and less time for mediation.
These witty images can be explained with 'metonymic rhetoric'.