metrician

metrician

(mɛˈtrɪʃən)
n
1. (Poetry) a person who studies poetic metre
2. (Poetry) obsolete a writer of metrical verse
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"I know Mike is a good 'metrician,'" Ted said, "but I don't know about the econ' part--is he a good economist?" Mike clearly was the most talented of the new Ph.D.'s that the St.
It presents the perspective of a metrician, a family physician, and the editors.
Agnes," "Lamia" and the Odes, Keats yearned to produce an epic poem in the style of Homer and Dante; two fruits of that yearning were the fragment "Hyperion" and later the aborted "The Fall of Hyperion." As for Byron, beyond "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage," "Cain," "The Vision of Judgment" and various narrative poems, the rollicksome satirical epic, "Don Juan," wholly suited his temperament and talents, especially his fiercely witty skill as a metrician. The poem has the happy quality of seeming to be happening, to be being created as we read.
Working in the land of metricians. Journal of Sports Economics, 11, 29-47.
Curiously, many metricians dealing with classical Greek (and Latin) drag their feet, as it were, in their unwillingness to admit that meter had anything to do with what we would call regular rhythm; similarly, meter in Hebrew poetry is often denied, despite much evidence to the contrary.
Williams himself was busy trying to express the American idiom and eventually employing what he called "the variable foot," which is a cagey notion, perhaps intended to impress metricians. He was trying to modulate free verse and also to write in the American idiom, by which he meant American rhythms and phrases.
Indeed, we can now see why later Greek metricians called the six-foot meter of tragedy trimeter and the six-foot meter of epic hexameter.
or -, which might have been troublesome to the dancers, but apparently gives metricians no qualms.
(6) The so-called Kongruenz-Gesetz in anapaests is based on the ancient metricians; cf e.g.