mezuzah

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me·zu·zah

also me·zu·za  (mə-zo͝oz′ə, -zo͞o-zä′)
n. pl. me·zu·zahs also me·zu·zas (-zo͝oz′əz) or me·zu·zot (-zo͞o-zôt′)
1. A small piece of parchment inscribed with the biblical passages Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and 11:13-21 and marked with the word Shaddai, a name of the Almighty, that is rolled up in a container and affixed by many Jewish households to their door frames in conformity with Jewish law and as a sign of their faith.
2. The container that holds this piece of parchment.

[Hebrew məzûzâ, doorpost, mezuzah; see ḏwḏ in Semitic roots.]

mezuzah

(məˈzʊzə; -ˈzuː-; Hebrew məzʊˈzɑ; Yiddish məˈzʊzə)
n, pl -zuzahs or -zuzoth (Hebrew -zuˈzɔt)
1. (Judaism) a piece of parchment inscribed with biblical passages and fixed to the doorpost of the rooms of a Jewish house
2. (Judaism) a metal case for such a parchment, sometimes worn as an ornament
[from Hebrew, literally: doorpost]

me•zu•zah

art at miasma

or me•zu•za

(məˈzʊz ə, -ˈzu zə)

n., pl. -zu•zoth, -zu•zot (-zuˈzɔt) -zu•zahs or -zu•zas.
Judaism. a parchment scroll inscribed with Deut. 6:4–9 and 11:13–21 and with the word Shaddai (a name for God), inserted in a case and attached to the doorpost of the home.
[1640–50; < Hebrew məzūzāh literally, doorpost]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish lawmezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish law
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
References in periodicals archive ?
For although many Jews, when moving out, do in fact leave a mezuzah on the front doorso often that the New York Times devoted a 2010 article to the practice ("In Mezuzas, a Custom Inherited by Gentiles")they aren't really supposed to.
For this reason, protective bowls or mezuzas were placed in entrances of buildings, and certain texts contain opening formulas that refer to these places.