mice


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mice

 (mīs)
n.
Plural of mouse.

mice

(maɪs)
n
the plural of mouse

mouse

(n. maʊs; v. maʊz)

n., pl. mice (maɪs) for 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, mice or mous•es for 4, n.
1. any of numerous small rodents of various families, having small ears and a long, thin tail, esp. an Old World mouse, Mus musculus, introduced worldwide.
2. a quiet, timid person.
3. a palm-sized device equipped with one or more buttons, used to point at and select items on a computer screen, with the displayed pointer controlled by means of analogous movement of the device on a nearby surface.
4. Informal. a black eye.
5. Slang. a girl; woman.
v.i.
6. to hunt for or catch mice.
7. to prowl about, as if in search of something.
[before 900; Middle English mous, Old English mūs; c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German mūs, Latin mūs, Greek mŷs, Russian mysh', Skt mūṣ-]
mouse′like`, adj.

mice

  • murine - Means "pertaining to mice or rodents."
  • muscle - Comes from Latin musculus, "little mouse," as the ancient Romans thought their muscles wriggled like mice.
  • mussel - Gets its name from Latin musculus, "little mouse."
  • dormouse - A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
Translations
miši

mice

pl de mouse
References in classic literature ?
"Why, I am a Queen--the Queen of all the Field Mice!"
At that moment several mice were seen running up as fast as their little legs could carry them, and when they saw their Queen they exclaimed:
But the Tin Woodman caught the dog in his arms and held him tight, while he called to the mice, "Come back!
"This must be a village of the Field Mice," he said to the Scarecrow." I wonder if my old friend, the Queen of the Mice, is in this neighborhood."
For the Tin Woodman had once saved her life, and the Queen of the Field Mice knew he was to be trusted."
The Queen uttered a little piping call, and in an instant a dozen pretty field mice had emerged from their holes and stood before their ruler, awaiting her orders.
Long ago, the mice had a general council to consider what measures they could take to outwit their common enemy, the Cat.
This proposal met with general applause, until an old mouse got up and said: "That is all very well, but who is to bell the Cat?" The mice looked at one another and nobody spoke.
(1) He also wrote the "Margites" attributed to Homer and the "Battle of the Frogs and Mice".
Fain would I sound in all men's ears that awful strife, that clamorous deed of war, and tell how the Mice proved their valour on the Frogs and rivalled the exploits of the Giants, those earth-born men, as the tale was told among mortals.
"Where do you come from," asked the Mice; "and what can you do?" They were so extremely curious.
"But I know the wood, where the sun shines and where the little birds sing." And then he told all about his youth; and the little Mice had never heard the like before; and they listened and said,