mick


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mick

 (mĭk)
n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a person of Irish birth or descent.

[Probably from the name Mick, nickname for Michael.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Mick

(mɪk) or

Mickey

n
1. (Peoples) (sometimes not capital) derogatory a slang name for an Irishman or a Roman Catholic
2. Austral the tails side of a coin
[C19: from the nickname for Michael]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mick

(mɪk)

n.
usage: This term is a slur and should be avoided. It is used with disparaging intent and is perceived as highly insulting.
n.
(sometimes cap.) Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. (a contemptuous term used to refer to a person of Irish birth or descent.)
[1855–60, Amer.; generic use of Mick, hypocoristic form of Michael]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mick - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Irish descent
depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
ethnic slur - a slur on someone's race or language
Irishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of Ireland
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Michi
References in classic literature ?
Having tried nine seasons at Dublin and two at Bath and Cheltenham, and not finding a partner for life, Miss Malony ordered her cousin Mick to marry her when she was about thirty-three years of age; and the honest fellow obeying, carried her off to the West Indies, to preside over the ladies of the --th regiment, into which he had just exchanged.
(Mind that divvle of a docther, Mick, and whatever ye du, keep yourself sober for me party this evening.)"
His name was Mick Walker, and he wore a ragged apron and a paper cap.
As often as Mick Walker went away in the course of that forenoon, I mingled my tears with the water in which I was washing the bottles; and sobbed as if there were a flaw in my own breast, and it were in danger of bursting.
Mealy Potatoes uprose once, and rebelled against my being so distinguished; but Mick Walker settled him in no time.
They's been too much drink, an' you know what the Micks are for a rough house."
But I won't give much for your good looks if some of them Micks lands on you."
"Naw," responded Jimmie with a valiant roar, "dese micks can't make me run."
It is a much more personal offering than Mick's previous album, I Own You, released in 2016, which dealt with themes such as anti-capitalism.
And younger brother Chris, 71, said Sir Mick is only here thanks to a routine check-up.
Rolling Stones star Sir Mick, 75, had emergency heart valve replacement surgery last week.