microampere


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Related to microampere: Nanoampere, Kiloampere

mi·cro·am·pere

 (mī′krō-ăm′pîr′)
n.
A unit of electric current equal to one millionth of an ampere.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

microampere

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈæmpɛə)
n
(Units) a millionth of an ampere
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mi•cro•am•pere

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈæm pɪər, -æmˈpɪər)

n.
a unit of electric current, equal to one millionth of an ampere.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When putting the DC voltage on the 2,4 store pool of the chip, respectively, we could meter the microampere level currents.
This new boost controller has a 3.0 microampere (muA) quiescent current when in sleep mode, allowing power consumption to be minimized.
When cooled to 1.5 kelvins, the device carries surprisingly large currents -- as high as 1 microampere -- that cross the junction through an area barely the size of an atom.
Current levels of the CES device, which range from 100 to 500 microamperes ([micro]A), were adjusted following the manufacturer's recommendations to a comfortable level just below where vertigo is experienced, usually in the 200-300 microampere range.
The device maximizes battery life by holding power dissipation to as low as typical 1 microampere (1uA) in Standby mode.
He now reports that "there is indeed a current in the microampere range that is consistently running through the plant day and night.' To see how important this current may be to the development of plants, he is now raising a crop of sunflowers, some of which have been electrically grounded.
Very minute currents (in the microampere range) produced naturally in bone and connective tissue appear to play an important role in maintaining the health of those tissues.
The open-circuit voltage and the short-circuit current are 1.02 volts and 1.27 microamperes, respectively.
Second, AEC sensors are characterized by an output signal that, ranging from a few nanoamperes to several microamperes, imposes conflicting requirements on the current voltage digitalization circuit--a high gain design can sense low gas concentrations but may saturate, while a low gain circuit suffers from reduced resolution but possesses a wider dynamic range.