micrococcus


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Related to micrococcus: staphylococcus, streptococcus

mi·cro·coc·cus

 (mī′krō-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. mi·cro·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
Any of various spherical, aerobic, gram-positive bacteria of the genus Micrococcus that are usually nonmotile and occur in pairs, tetrads, or irregular clusters.

mi′cro·coc′cal (-kŏk′əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

micrococcus

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) any spherical Gram-positive bacterium of the genus Micrococcus: family Micrococcaceae
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mi•cro•coc•cus

(ˌmaɪ krəˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
any spherical bacterium of the genus Micrococcus, occurring in irregular masses, many species of which are pigmented and are saprophytic or parasitic.
[< New Latin (1872); see micro-, coccus]
mi`cro•coc′cal, mi`cro•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.micrococcus - type genus of the family MicrococcaceaeMicrococcus - type genus of the family Micrococcaceae
bacteria genus - a genus of bacteria
family Micrococcaceae, Micrococcaceae - spherical or elliptical usually aerobic eubacteria that produce yellow or orange or red pigment; includes toxin-producing forms as well as harmless commensals and saprophytes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

mi·cro·coc·cus

n. micrococo, microorganismo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cell free culture supernatants were obtained by centrifugation (10,000 x g, 4[degrees]C, 20 min) of LAB cultures, and the supernatants were filtered through a 0.22 pm filter to remove residual cells, then, they were examined by the diameters of inhibition zones using agar diffusion assay method (Ennahar et al., 2000) with Salmonella enterica ATCC [43971.sup.T], Escherichia coli ATCC [11775.sup.T] (Gram-negative bacteria) and Micrococcus luteus ATCC [4698.sup.T] (Gram-positive bacteria) as indicator strains.
Ethyl acetate soluble fraction also showed strong activity against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 with MIC=62.5 g/disc.
Foram realizados ainda antibiogramas com a utilizacao de discos de novobiocina (5[micro]g) e polimixina B (300 UI), bem como furazolidona (100 [micro]g) e bacitracina (0,04UI), para diferenciagao entre os generos Micrococcus e Staphylococcus.
Infection was then produced via the inoculation of serial tenfold dilutions of a culture of either Staphylococcus aureus or Micrococcus species into the suprapatellar pouch.
He points out that "widespread antibiotic use for acne and rosacea has been implicated in the conversion of normal cutaneous saprophytes into drug-resistant pathogens." As an example, the author cites the fact that tetracycline-resistant Micrococcus luteus has been implicated as a cause of bacterial endocarditis.
Six clinical bacterial species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter, Staphylococcus aureus (methicilline resistant), Micrococcus luteus and one fungal strain; Aspergillus niger were used for antimicrobial and antifungal assay.
cereus, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and yeast (Candida albicans).
However, Staphylococcus and Micrococcus were recovered from sacred forest and degraded land with different frequencies during hot and cold seasons.
Among bacteria able to grow in fuel, genera such as Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Aeromonas, Achromobacter, Arthrobacter, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Micrococcus have been reported (Gaylarde et al.
In 1885 a French scientist Thomson Doyen not only isolated a bacterium (that he named Micrococcus neoformans) from tumours, but he also produced a vaccine from the bacteria.