microfibre

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microfibre

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfaɪbə) or

microfiber

n
(Textiles) a very fine synthetic fibre used for textiles
Translations

microfibre

microfiber (US) [ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfaɪbəʳ] Nmicrofibra f

microfibre

[ˈmaɪkrəʊfaɪbər] (British) microfiber (US) nmicrofibre f
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References in periodicals archive ?
[USA], Aug 30 (ANI): Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, researchers have found.
In the washable segment, the products are textile scraps/rags, terry towels and microfibers. The nonwovens industry supplies to the disposable side of the industry and almost has no presence in the washable side."
Sinta succeeds Grace Fibers, Grace Microfibers and Gilco Fiber brands, and spans Sinta F (fibrillated), Sinta M (monofilament) and Sinta FDS (fluid delivery system) synthetic microfibers for concrete.
Compared to a previous work, with this paper the authors propose a new fabrication methodology for smart bricks using ultrathin stainless steel microfibers (diameter of 12 p) with a high level of conductivity and thermal resistance as reinforcement.
A (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17306094?via%3Dihub) study published by the Marine Pollution Bulletin said the Hudson River in New York pumps out around 300 million microfibers into the Atlantic Ocean every day.
In fact, microfibers are estimated to be responsible for over eighty percent of shoreline pollution around the world.
The method allows obtaining materials based on nano- and microfibers which demonstrate high porosity and specific surface area (the latter features are necessary for migration and proliferation of cells in graft volume) and simultaneously keep tightness with respect to blood [31-33].
Formulation of active wound dressing material could be achieved by structural control of electrospun nonwoven materials and efficient loading of drug substances into nano/ microfibers. Studies on manufacturing bicomponent chitosan/PLA hybrid nanofibrous materials and evaluation of their antibacterial properties have confirmed the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria S.
"Overusing muscles like this creates microfibers, or mild scar tissue, in the connective tissue between the muscles.
Last but not least, transcrystals are needed to increase the interfacial interaction between the microfibers of polymeric [beta]-nucleating agent and iPP matrix.
In this research, cellulose microfibers are converted into nanocomposite directly instead of producing nanometric particles and production of nanocomposites.