microform

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Related to microforms: microfilm, microfiche

mi·cro·form

 (mī′krə-fôrm′)
n.
An arrangement of images reduced in size, as on microfilm or microfiche.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

microform

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfɔːm)
n
(Computer Science) computing a method of storing symbolic information by using photographic reduction techniques, such as microfilm, microfiche, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mi•cro•form

(ˈmaɪ krəˌfɔrm)

n.
any form, either film or paper, containing microreproductions.
[1955–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

microform

A generic term for any form, whether film, video tape, paper, or other medium, containing miniaturized or otherwise compressed images which cannot be read without special display devices.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
Translations

microform

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfɔːm] Nmicroforma f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As further endorsement, the American Library Association officially accepted microforms as a method of information storage at its annual meeting in 1936.
* Kodak--"What's new in microforms? Come to Kodak."
The Microforms Department of the University of New Brunswick's Harriet Irving Library is pleased to present to the public the Marianne Grey Otty Database.
The statistics include approximate information on number of bound volumes, current periodicals, online databases, manuscripts and codices, incunabula, theses and dissertations, official documents, music scores, maps, microforms, audio- visual materials, sound recordings, digital data carriers, and other materials.
Result and Interpretation Table 1: Assessment of user satisfaction with Electronic Resources Types of Electronic Resources Responses Very Inadequate Inadequate No % No % Functional Computers 104 41.6 63 25.2 Photocopying Machines 87 34.8 74 29.6 CD-ROM Resources 127 50.8 68 27.2 Microforms 136 54.4 79 31.6 Microform Readers 153 61.2 63 25.2 Fax Machines 187 74.8 37 14.8 Internet Services 111 44.4 38 15.2 Local Area Network 126 50.4 56 22.4 Radio Message 150 60.0 52 20.8 Telephone 111 44.4 48 19.2 Lighting 49 19.6 34 13.6 No.
Other spaces open to the public are devoted to magazines, posters, stamps, postal cards, digital documents, microforms, and printed papers in addition to a multimedia space.
"We had about 700,000 print volumes and recordings underwater for about three weeks," says associate dean Andrew Corrigan, in addition to roughly 1.5 million pieces of microform. Library management had to make quick decisions about what to save and enlisted Belfor, a disaster restoration specialist, to help recover collections of government documents, microforms, newspapers, and a music library.
Historically, librarians have saved space and made journal backfiles available to users through the spread of microforms. Now, librarians are struggling to incorporate online electronic resources effectively into their collections.
The library enjoys an international reputation and in addition to its collection of material from the rest of the UK and Ireland, the Aberystwyth institution possesses an unrivalled collection of Celtic works about Wales, including books and pamphlets, magazines and newspapers, microforms, ephemera, and a wealth of electronic material.
Its collections include microforms, photographs, printed materials and other items relating to the history of Wilberforce University, the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and 19th century publications by or about African Americans.