microgram


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mi·cro·gram

 (mī′krō-grăm′)
n.
A unit of mass equal to one thousandth (10-3) of a milligram or one millionth (10-6) of a gram.

microgram

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌɡrɑːm)
n
(Units) one millionth of a gram

mi•cro•gram

(ˈmaɪ krəˌgræm)

n.
a unit of mass or weight equal to one millionth of a gram. Symbol:μg
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microgram - one millionth (1/1,000,000) gram
metric weight unit, weight unit - a decimal unit of weight based on the gram
mg, milligram - one thousandth (1/1,000) gram
nanogram, ng - one billionth (1/1,000,000,000) gram
Translations

microgram

n microgramo
References in periodicals archive ?
Children aged 1 to 4 years should have a daily 10 microgram vitamin D supplement.
When it started back in 1967, Microgram was a few typewritten pages in which chemists shared lab techniques for analyzing and identifying the drugs that were showing up on the street.
MicroGRAM provides the Navys AEODRS program the small, embedded, secure GPS necessary to ensure mission success, said Mike Jones, vice president and general manager of Communication, Navigation and Electronic Warfare Solutions for Rockwell Collins.
Data now suggest that lead affects development of kids' thinking skills at concentrations below 10 micrograms per deciliters ([micro]g/dl) of blood.
Rockwell Collins declared that it has been contracted by the AeroVironment for the supply of its MicroGRAM GPS receiver for the Wasp AE small unmanned aircraft system, bringing secure, jam-resistant GPS capability to a micro UAV for the first time.
Rockwell Collins declared that AeroVironment has chosen its MicroGRAM GPS receiver for the Wasp AE small unmanned aircraft system, allowing secure, jam-resistant GPS capability to a micro UAV for the first time.
Although the federal Centers for Disease Control considers up to 30 micrograms per deciliter ([microgram]/dl) an "acceptable" lead level in children, the high-lead group in this study averaged only 50 to 58 percent of that concentration.
Analysts have predicted that milk from transgenic animals must contain more than 1 microgram of drug per milliliter in order for the procedure to prove cost effective as a means of manufacturing pharmaceuticals.
Lead showed a steady increase, from an initial level of 89 micrograms of lead per liter to between 2,160 and 5,330 [microgram'/l four months later.
In plants exposed to the highest oil concentrations, levels of proteinase inhibitors I and II soared to 300 and 260 micrograms per gram ([microgram]/g) of leaf tissue, respectively.