middlebrow


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mid·dle·brow

 (mĭd′l-brou′)
n. Informal
One who is somewhat cultured, with conventional tastes and interests; one who is neither highbrow nor lowbrow.


mid′dle·brow′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

middlebrow

(ˈmɪdəlˌbraʊ)
n
a person with conventional tastes and limited cultural appreciation
adj
of or appealing to middlebrows: middlebrow culture.
ˈmiddleˌbrowism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mid•dle•brow

(ˈmɪd lˌbraʊ)

n.
1. a person of conventional tastes and interests; a moderately cultivated person.
adj.
2. characteristic of or catering to middlebrows.
[1920–25]
mid′dle•brow`ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.middlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrowmiddlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrow
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlbraʊ]
A. ADJde or para gusto medianamente culto, de gusto entre intelectual y plebeyo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

middlebrow

middle-brow [ˈmɪdəlbraʊ] adjgrand public invmiddle class nclasse f moyenne
the growth of a large middle class → le développement d'une importante classe moyenne
the middle class → la classe moyenne
the middle classes → les classes fpl moyennesmiddle-class [ˌmɪdəlˈklɑːs] adj
[people, family] → de la classe moyenne
a middle-class family → une famille de la classe moyenne
to be middle-class [person] → être bourgeois(e)
[home, suburb, area] → bourgeois(e)
[attitudes, values, culture, life] → bourgeois(e)middle course n (between more extreme alternatives)juste milieu m, voie f médianemiddle-distance race ncourse f de demi-fondmiddle-distance runner ncoureur/euse m/f de demi-fondmiddle ear noreille f moyenneMiddle East n
the Middle East → le Moyen-Orient
in the Middle East → au Moyen-Orient
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlˌbraʊ] (pej)
1. adj (fiction, play, film) per il lettore o spettatore ecc medio
2. nchi ha una cultura media
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The result, he says, was not a decline of cultural levels, but a blurring of the boundary between highbrow (modernist) and middlebrow (anti-modernist) writing.
Then the barbs that The Outsiders aims at the homegrown oik fraternity may be well intended, but the effect only adds to Athlete's prissy middlebrow image.
Steve Mentz concludes his engaging new study of Elizabethan fiction with the lament and promise that "prose fiction has long been the ignored little sibling of drama and verse in [English] Renaissance studies," but that the time has come to "rescue Greene from his deathbed and transform him into a wandering spirit of prose fiction" because of his seminal role in the rise of "middlebrow" writing in the 1580s and 90s--a print-culture phenomenon that simultaneously aligned itself with the ethos of the age and, for the censorious, threatened to destabilize both tastes and morals.
Dayton and Faris are likely loathe to admit it, but Little Miss Sunshine's spiritual descendant is not Wes Anderson's innovative Bottle Rocket, or even Napoleon Dynamite, but the middlebrow blockbuster My Big Fat Greek Wedding.
His feisty criticism in their pages amounted to a running commentary on what he regarded as the shabby "midcult" of post-war America and the middlebrow literature that thrived in the 1950s--literature that he despised.
How could he make moral and aesthetic judgments given his sense of increasing cultural impoverishment in "middlebrow" culture?
Such narratives often bolster post-feminist oppositions between a "low," voyeuristic male heterosexuality that is at best undiscriminating and at worst barbaric and a more complex, mysterious, "middlebrow" female heterosexuality.
However, while Place Of Reeds may be prime fodder for the middlebrow media, it falls down as a work of literature because of flawed writing and editing.
Opposite Adams is the decidedly middlebrow Edward Bok, who, though equally well known in his day as the editor of The Ladies Home Journal, has since faded into obscurity.
It provided a radical break from the patio-doors poppycock made popular by middle-class, middlebrow authors like Terence Rattigan.
Hoping to develop a middlebrow market by building trust in the discernment of his imprint, Knopf initially concentrated on foreign authors in translation like Thomas Mann to target Americans' sense that good literature could provide stability in changing times.
In this sense, von Arnim is a good example of that relatively unexplored figure in the New Woman debate, the middlebrow feminist.