midlist


Also found in: Wikipedia.

mid·list

 (mĭd′lĭst′)
n.
The portion of a publisher's list of new or current titles made up of books expected to have less popular appeal than the frontlist.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: For the past few decades that saw that the increasing consolidation of established publishers was resulting in fewer and fewer access opportunities for the publication books by unknown or midlist authors.
Dr Zarqa is gold midlist of Punjab University from where she graduated in 1989.
Between 2008 and 2014, the number of available books rose from 300,000 mainstream titles and 60,000 indie, midlist, and small-press titles to 290,000 of the latter, says LaRue.
Publishing company HarperCollins (HC) has acquired The Midlist, a daily e-mail newsletter that reports e-book deals, book trade news company Publishers Weekly revealed on Wednesday.
But the past fifteen years have seen an astonishing compression of the publishing industry: advances have shrunk or disappeared entirely; book tours have turned to blog tours as publicity budgets have dwindled for all except the biggest and most mainstream titles; midlist authors fall to the bottom of the heap and struggle to make a place for the kinds of books that once found a steady readership; beginning authors increasingly find themselves squeezed out of traditional publishing entirely.
Available content originated almost entirely from mainstream commercial publishing, or the previously mentioned Big Six publishers, but three additional important streams of econtent were also largely unavailable to libraries: independent or midlist publishers, local historical documents, and self-published books.
"Even big authors, if you're midlist, you still have to sell your book yourself," she says.
So that which is original, or at least, isn't repetitive, tends to get shunted into a neglected, unpromoted midlist that's getting smaller all of the time and science fiction is a genre which has always depended on originality.
If they didn't win prizes or sell in huge numbers, they were consigned to the dreaded 'midlist', the publishing industry's death row.
A significant chunk of the back catalog, as well as local titles, niche works, older titles, and midlist titles (to borrow a term from the publishing industry), are not yet available via online channels.