midsummer


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mid·sum·mer

 (mĭd′sŭm′ər)
n.
1. The middle of the summer.
2. The summer solstice, on or about June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

midsummer

(ˈmɪdˈsʌmə)
n
1.
a. the middle or height of the summer
b. (as modifier): a midsummer carnival.
2. (Astronomy) another name for summer solstice
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mid•sum•mer

(ˈmɪdˈsʌm ər, -ˌsʌm-)

n.
1. the middle of summer.
2. the summer solstice, around June 21.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or occurring in the middle of the summer.
[before 900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midsummer - June 21, when the sun is at its northernmost pointmidsummer - June 21, when the sun is at its northernmost point
June - the month following May and preceding July
solstice - either of the two times of the year when the sun is at its greatest distance from the celestial equator
summer, summertime - the warmest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox; "they spent a lazy summer at the shore"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُنْتَصَف الصَّيْف
uprostřed léta
midsommermidsommer-
nyárközép
JoninėsJoninių naktisvasarvidisvidurvasaris
vasaras vidus/saulgrieži
uprostred leta
yaz ortası

midsummer

[ˈmɪdˈsʌməʳ]
A. Npleno verano m
in midsummeren pleno verano
"Midsummer Night's Dream""El sueño de una noche de verano"
B. CPD Midsummer('s) Day NDía m de San Juan (24 junio)
midsummer madness Nlocura f pasajera
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

midsummer

[ˌmɪdˈsʌmər]
nle plein été m
in midsummer → en plein été
modif [day, morning] → d'été
a midsummer day in the midst of a heat-wave → un jour d'été en pleine canicule
"A Midsummer Night's Dream" by William Shakespeare → "Songe d'une nuit d'été" de William ShakespeareMidsummer Day Midsummer's Day nSaint-Jean fmid-term blues n [government] → chute f de popularité de milieu de mandatmidterm elections [ˌmɪdtɛrmɪˈlɛkʃənz] nplélections fpl de mi-mandatmidterm exams [ˌmɪdtɛrmɪgˈzæmz] nplexamens mpl de mi-trimestre
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

midsummer

[ˈmɪdˌsʌməʳ] npiena estate f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

midsummer

(midˈsamə) noun
the middle of summer. It happened in midsummer; (also adjective) a midsummer day.
Midsummer ˈDay noun
the 24th of June when the saint's day of St. John the Baptist is celebrated.
Midsummer ˈEve noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Laurence sat in a recess near the book-ease, reading, not for the first time, the Midsummer Night's Dream.
The intervals of silence grew longer and longer, the voice fainter and farther, and by midsummer it was heard no more.
That, pending the arrival of this period, an income of six hundred pounds was to be paid to him by his two Trustees, half-yearly--at Christmas and Midsummer Day.
"You see, I want to put him to a new school at Midsummer," said Mr.
But the fir-wood behind the little house was forever green and staunch; and even in November and December there came gracious days of sunshine and purple hazes, when the harbor danced and sparkled as blithely as in midsummer, and the gulf was so softly blue and tender that the storm and the wild wind seemed only things of a long-past dream.
{Shakespeare, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Act III, Scene 1, lines 137-141}
Spite of this frigid winter night in the boisterous Atlantic, spite of my wet feet and wetter jacket, there was yet, it then seemed to me, many a pleasant haven in store; and meads and glades so eternally vernal, that the grass shot up by the spring, untrodden, unwilted, remains at midsummer. At last we gained such an offing, that the two pilots were needed no longer.
The sky was what is called a mackerel sky--rows and rows of faint down-plumes of cloud, just tinted with the midsummer sunset.
As the night air in these elevated regions is apt to be cold, a blazing fire was soon made, that would have done credit to a Christmas dinner, instead of a midsummer banquet.
The glory of a perfect English midsummer lay like a golden spell upon the land.
One dark night in midsummer a man waking from a dreamless sleep in a forest lifted his head from the earth, and staring a few moments into the blackness, said: "Catherine Larue." He said nothing more; no reason was known to him why he should have said so much.
A splendid Midsummer shone over England: skies so pure, suns so radiant as were then seen in long succession, seldom favour even singly, our wave-girt land.