migration


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mi·gra·tion

 (mī-grā′shən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of migrating.
2. A group migrating together.
3. Chemistry & Physics
a. The movement of one atom or more from one position to another within a molecule.
b. The movement of ions between electrodes during electrolysis.

mi·gra′tion·al adj.

migration

(maɪˈɡreɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of migrating
2. a group of people, birds, etc, migrating in a body
3. (Chemistry) chem a movement of atoms, ions, or molecules, such as the motion of ions in solution under the influence of electric fields
miˈgrational adj

mi•gra•tion

(maɪˈgreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process or act of migrating.
2. a migratory movement.
3. a number or body of persons or animals migrating together.
[1605–15; < Latin]
mi•gra′tion•al, adj.

Migration

 the persons, mammals, or birds that take part in migratory movements abroad, collectively.
Examples: migration of birds, 1704; of salmon, 1704; of souls of men, 1727.

emigration

immigrationmigration
1. 'emigrate', 'emigration', 'emigrant'

If you emigrate, you leave your own country and go to live permanently in another country.

He received permission to emigrate to Canada.
He had emigrated from Germany in the early 1920's.

People who emigrate are called emigrants. The act of emigrating is called emigration. However, these words are less frequent than immigrant and immigration.

2. 'immigrate', 'immigration', 'immigrant'

If you immigrate to a country, you go to live in that country permanently.

They immigrated to Israel.

However, it is more common to say that someone emigrates from a country than to say that someone immigrates to a country.

People that leave their own country to live in another country are called immigrants.

The company employs several immigrants.

The process by which people come to live in a country is called immigration.

The government has changed its immigration policy.
3. 'migrate', 'migration', 'migrant'

When people migrate, they temporarily move to another place, usually a city or another country, in order to find work.

The only solution people can see is to migrate.
Millions have migrated to the cities.

This process is called migration.

New jobs are encouraging migration from the cities of the north.

People who migrate are called migrants or migrant workers.

She was a migrant looking for a place to live.
In South America there are three million migrant workers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.migration - the movement of persons from one country or locality to anothermigration - the movement of persons from one country or locality to another
emigration, out-migration, expatriation - migration from a place (especially migration from your native country in order to settle in another)
immigration, in-migration - migration into a place (especially migration to a country of which you are not a native in order to settle there)
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
gold rush - a large migration of people to a newly discovered gold field
2.migration - a group of people migrating together (especially in some given time period)migration - a group of people migrating together (especially in some given time period)
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
3.migration - (chemistry) the nonrandom movement of an atom or radical from one place to another within a molecule
event - something that happens at a given place and time
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
4.migration - the periodic passage of groups of animals (especially birds or fishes) from one region to another for feeding or breedingmigration - the periodic passage of groups of animals (especially birds or fishes) from one region to another for feeding or breeding
periodic event, recurrent event - an event that recurs at intervals

migration

noun wandering, journey, voyage, travel, movement, shift, trek, emigration, roving the migration of Soviet Jews to Israel

migration

noun
Departure from one's native land to settle in another:
Translations
هِجْرَةٌهِجْرَه
migrace
emigrationimmigrationmigrationudvandringvandring
maastamuutto
migracija
költözés
fólksflutningar
移住
이주
migrácia
migration
การโยกย้ายถิ่นฐาน
sự di trú

migration

[maɪˈgreɪʃən] Nmigración f

migration

[maɪˈgreɪʃən] n
[animal, bird, fish] → migration f
[people] → migration f

migration

n
Wanderung f; (of birds)(Vogel)zug m; (fig: of people) → Abwanderung f, → Migration f; (seasonal) → Zug m; (Comput) (of software infrastructute etc)Migration f
(= number)Schwarm m

migration

[maɪˈgreɪʃn] n (see vb) → migrazione f, emigrazione f

migrate

(maiˈgreit) , ((American) ˈmaigreit) verb
1. (of certain birds and animals) to travel from one region to another at certain times of the year. Many birds migrate in the early winter.
2. (of people) to change one's home to another country or (regularly) from place to place. The Gothic peoples who overwhelmed the Roman Empire migrated from the East.
miˈgration noun
ˈmigrant ((British and American) ˈmai-) noun
a person, bird or animal that migrates or has migrated. The swallow is a summer migrant to Britain; (also adjective) migrant workers.
ˈmigratory ((British and American) ˈmaigrə-) adjective

migration

هِجْرَةٌ migrace migration Migration αποδημία migración maastamuutto migration migracija migrazione 移住 이주 migratie vandring migracja emigração, migração миграция migration การโยกย้ายถิ่นฐาน göç sự di trú 移民

mi·gra·tion

n. migración, movimiento de las células de un lugar a otro.
References in classic literature ?
That they would have done so in the time to come is undoubted; but the migration of the Fire People, and the consequent migration of the survivors of the Folk, set back our evolution for centuries.
Indeed, there is no telling how disastrous was to be the outcome of the Fire People's migration.
When the old nest is found inconvenient, and they have to migrate, it is the slaves which determine the migration, and actually carry their masters in their jaws.
One day I fortunately chanced to witness a migration from one nest to another, and it was a most interesting spectacle to behold the masters carefully carrying, as Huber has described, their slaves in their jaws.
He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws of Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.
Anglo-Saxon Poetry, on the Continent in prehistoric times before the migration to England, and in England especially during the Northumbrian Period, seventh and eighth centuries A.
Soon after the migration to the "warm rivers," in which he had taken part like the rest, Dron was made village Elder and overseer of Bogucharovo, and had since filled that post irreproachably for twenty-three years.
The consequence is that the Rocky Mountains and the ulterior regions, from the Russian possessions in the north down to the Spanish settlements of California, have been traversed and ransacked in every direction by bands of hunters and Indian traders; so that there is scarcely a mountain pass, or defile, that is not known and threaded in their restless migrations, nor a nameless stream that is not haunted by the lonely trapper.
The voyageurs or boatmen were the rank and file in the service of the trader, and even the hardy "men of the north," those great rufflers and game birds, were fain to be paddled from point to point of their migrations.
So assured, indeed, is the fact concerning the periodicalness of the sperm whale's resorting to given waters, that many hunters believe that, could he be closely observed and studied throughout the world; were the logs for one voyage of the entire whale fleet carefully collated, then the migrations of the sperm whale would be found to correspond in invariability to those of the herring-shoals or the flights of swallows.
Wanderers of the wilderness, according to the vicissitudes of the seasons, the migrations of animals, and the plenty or scarcity of game, they lead a precarious and unsettled existence; exposed to sun and storm, and all kinds of hardships, until they resemble Indians in complexion as well as in tastes and habits.
The last of these temporary migrations had taken place only a few days since; the admiral had satisfied himself that the rooms in the east wing were none the worse for the absence of their master, and he might now be safely reckoned on as settled in the north wing for weeks, and perhaps, if the season was cold, for months to come.

Full browser ?