military intervention


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military intervention

The deliberate act of a nation or a group of nations to introduce its military forces into the course of an existing controversy.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
Security Council could not muster unanimty for a press statement condemning Syria; moreover, Russia seems dead-set against military intervention. [NYT]
military intervention in Libya to pressure Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi to end the violence and step down.
Before he turns to the specific question of Western aid for Afghanistan he describes, as he must, the history of military intervention in the country in recent centuries: British.
In reality, not all atrocity crimes, particularly some categories of crimes against humanity and war crimes, necessarily justify military intervention as the most extreme application of R2P.
Ottawa -- The Abdul Rahman affair has had the sudden effect of causing some people to question Canada's military involvement in Afghanistan, in addition to the U.S.'s military intervention in Iraq.
The PM is said to have asked government officials to draw up plans for military intervention.
But, according to UPI's Shaun Waterman, "Sliney and his NORAD counterpart were unsure who had the power to order a military intervention. It took Sliney more than five minutes to ascertain where the authority lay." In five minutes, a jet under full throttle can cover 50 miles.
This does not mean that an intellectual tradition as important as military intervention for humanitarian purposes should not be retrieved and developed.
Until the Kosovo precedent of "humanitarian international military intervention" within a sovereign state to protect the basic human rights of minorities (but not to overthrow its government), specialists in international law knew only two exceptions to this comprehensive prohibition of state-sponsored violence: The first exception is every state's natural right to self-defense (Article 51 of the charter).
Could support US led military intervention without a Security Council authorisation.
The author shows the centrality of Egypt's military intervention in Yemen to regional politics and interprets Northern politics since Egypt's involvement primarily as a split between soldiers (pro-Egypt) and other political actors.

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